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Archive for the ‘Development’ Category

Entrepreneurs Need Web Developers Like Planes Need Wings. So, Where Are They? (Infographic)

Tuesday, June 30th, 2015

Web Developers !

In this day and age, web developers are the wings for many entrepreneurs’ planes. Finding a good one who will stick around can be critical for success.

So where are these mystical, magical web developers? San Francisco-based software company Lucidworks analyzed the U.S. government’s employment data and generated the infographic below, which offers a snapshot of where developers work and how much they make, on average.

Silicon Valley’s home state has more than twice the number of web developers (230,000 plus) than the second-most saturated state, Texas (almost 110,000). By contrast, Wyoming has fewer than 600 developers total.

If you are thinking about starting a company that will need developers, or if you are looking to expand your existing development team, have a look at the infographic below to figure out what you will have to offer to be competitive.

Entrepreneurs Need Web Developers Like Planes Need Wings. So, Where Are They? (Infographic)

 

Article Provide by: Entrepreneur

If you would like Mojoe.net to discuss developing your social media marketing, logo, web site, web application, need custom programming, or IT consultant, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-859-9848 or you can email us at dwerne@mojoe.net.

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8 Ways to Get More People to Read Your Content

Thursday, April 9th, 2015

8 Ways to Get More People to Read Your Content

8 Incredibly Simple Ways to Get More People to Read Your Content - 8 content design tips

Your precious words. You know they’ve got to be right to attract the audience you want.

You’ve slaved over them, carefully crafting each phrase. You finally hit “publish,” and what happens?

Nobody reads them.

No comments, no tweets, no sharing on Facebook.

It’s enough to send a writer into deep depression, and wipe out motivation to keep producing great content.

Think you need to spend another 10,000 hours perfecting your writing skills? Probably not.

Actually, the solution may be a lot easier than you expect. Writing less and styling your text so it’s easy to read could be all you need to do to attract and hold attention.

Impatient searchers

Jakob Nielson’s seminal web usability study from 1997 showed that 79% of web users scan rather than read.

Think about how you use the web. You’re in search of information. And if you don’t find it on the page you’re visiting, you click away and look elsewhere.

The web is a “lean forward and participate” medium. Television, by contrast, is a “lean back and let it wash over me” medium.

What can you do to engage your readers so they lean into your content, stay on your pages and interact with your information?

Make it snappy

To write successfully for the web, you need to forget some of what you learned in English composition class.

Accept that people scan web pages rather than reading them in detail, and work with this reality rather than fighting it.

If you want to cover a complex topic, consider breaking it into a series of posts. It’s a great way to keep people coming back for more, and your reader will find it easier to digest your content if they get it in portion-controlled sizes.

Structure your paragraphs in the inverted pyramid style. This means stating your conclusion first, then supporting it with the sentences that follow. This helps scanners to move from point to point, and decide where they’d like to dive in deeper.

Once you’ve done that, use the following easy design techniques to make your content much more reader-friendly. It takes just a few minutes to turn a post from an overwhelming mass of gray text to something that engages the reader and pulls her in.

1. Embrace the line break

There are few easier ways to make your content more readable. Even complex content can be made much more reader-friendly with the simple introduction of lots of white space. Feature one idea per paragraph, and keep them short — three or four sentences at most.

And try writing some paragraphs with one sentence only.

2. Break up your content with compelling subheads

One technique taught here at Copyblogger is to write your headline and subheads first.

A strong headline (and therefore a strong premise) is vital to getting readers to come check you out in the first place. And solid subheads keep the reader engaged, acting as “mini headlines” to keep them moving through the rest of your content.

Make your subheads intriguing, but informative, too. Web readers have well-honed BS meters, so don’t exaggerate or you’ll lose credibility. “Compelling” is not the same as “hypey.”

Once you’ve written your subheads, review them to see what your reader/scanner will understand if he or she reads only that part of your article. Is there a compelling story? Will they get the gist of your information?

3. Use bulleted lists

  • They create fascinations your readers can’t resist
  • They’re an easily-scannable way to present multiple points
  • They look different from the rest of your text, so they provide a visual break for your reader

4. Use deep captions.

Studies have shown that image captions are consistently some of the most-read copy on a page. Try pairing a strong image with a “deep caption.”

Deep captions are two to three sentences long. That’s long enough to intrigue your reader to dig in to your whole article.

5. Add highly relevant links

Internal links back to your own cornerstone content will keep people on your site and reading your best material.

External links demonstrate that you’ve researched the topic and want to highlight other experts.

Good content uses both to expand your reader’s understanding and add value.

Another advantage of internal links is they make it less frustrating when some dirtbag scrapes your content (cuts and pastes it to their own site without attribution).

6. Use strategic formatting

Add emphasis to your web copy by bolding important concepts. You reader will be able to scan through and pick out the most important information at a glance.

Don’t highlight everything (which would have the same effect as highlighting nothing). Instead, emphasize the key points so the scanner can quickly pick them out.

7. Harness the power of numbers

Think those numbered list posts are tired? Think again. Numbers are an incredibly effective way to both capture attention and to keep the reader oriented.

If you don’t believe me, take a quick look at the “Popular Articles” on the right hand of this site. You’ll get a mini-tutorial in some of the ways you can use numbers (and other techniques) to make a post more inviting.

You can often make a post more compelling just by numbering your main points. Give it a try.

8. Check your dual readership path

Once you’ve used subheads, numbers, bulleted lists and other formatting to highlight the key elements of your post, read through it again — looking only at the text you’ve called special attention to.

Does the reader get the gist? Have you pulled out the most interesting and relevant words, the words that will pull your scanner in and turn her into a reader?

How about you? What are your favorite techniques for getting readers to lean in to your web content? Let’s talk about it in the comments.

Article Provided By CopyBlogger

If you would like Mojoe.net to discuss developing your logo, web site, web application, need custom programming, or IT consultant, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-859-9848 or you can email us at dwerne@mojoe.net.

The 3 Essential Elements of Quality Content

Thursday, April 2nd, 2015

 

Quality Content

Quality Content - Another Piece Of The PuzzleIt can actually get a little awkward.

I’ll have someone ask me why the content on their site has rapidly dropped in the search engines, or isn’t getting any real engagement with readers, or isn’t converting to opt-ins.

I look at the site and realize there’s no nice way to say it:

Their content sucks.

Painful, I know. The site owner genuinely thinks they’re creating “quality content” because they’re having original material written.

But the content has no life, no personality, no usefulness to the reader, no entertainment value, and a terrible headline.

That’s not “quality content.”

Your best defense against “Crappy Content Syndrome” is to read Copyblogger, because every week we give you ideas about how to make your content better.

But here’s the distillation of our most important advice on the topic:

1. It has to be useful

Content marketing needs to solve some kind of reader problem. That’s why it’s often so useful to start with the words “How To” and then give some thought to how you can finish that headline in an interesting way.

By the way, part of making your content useful is making it friendly for your readers’ eyes. Pamela Wilson wrote a great quick tutorial about that: 8 Incredibly Simple Ways to Get More People to Read Your Content.

2. It has to be interesting

Good content has personality. It has style. It has … dare I say it … authority.

It might be funny, opinionated, charming, snarky, or enthusiastic. But it isn’t dry or bland.

If your reader just wants facts, she’ll go to Wikipedia. When she wants a more interesting, opinionated, flavorful view on facts, that’s when you can step in.

This is very tricky to pull off if you don’t consider yourself a writer. You don’t have to make your 5th-grade English teacher happy, but you do have to be able to express yourself in an interesting way.

If you’re trying to sound “professional” or to create content that looks like a big company created it … stop now. You’re going in the wrong direction. Your content should look, feel, and sound personal … like a friendly, smart figure who’s got your prospect’s problems all figured out.

3. It has to have the “cookie factor”

When you’re emailing, blogging, and creating white papers, videos or other content that are both useful and valuable, you’re building what I call Cookie Content.

That’s content that inherently rewards the reader for consuming or sharing it. It actually acts as a small “reward” for clicking. Every time the reader clicks on your link, opens your email, or shares your content, good things happen — useful, interesting, and user-friendly information gets shared.

Put yourself into your reader’s shoes and ask yourself if the content you’re creating is truly rewarding for that reader.

Does it get him closer to his goals? Does it entertain her, or at least keep her interest? Are the site design and user interface pleasing? Is the content formatted to be easy to read, and across multiple devices?

Good content will build an audience faster than anything else

You’ve probably noticed that there’s a sea of not-too-good content out there.

Thin, uninteresting, not-very-useful junk that just fills up space.

By making a commitment to create content that’s both useful and interesting, you rise above the sea of internet trash. Even though creating good content isn’t always easy, it probably is the most straightforward way to differentiate your business and show your value.

Article Provided By CopyBlogger

If you would like Mojoe.net to discuss developing your logo, web site, web application, need custom programming, or IT consultant, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-859-9848 or you can email us at dwerne@mojoe.net.

Invest In a Great Website

Saturday, March 7th, 2015

 Invest In a Great Website - Contact

Stop Being Such a Tight Wad. Invest In a Great Website.

You just worked your ass off for the last 12 months.

Creating your product. Having samples made. Ordering 1 million of them because that’s the factory’s minimum.

You had someone in Indonesia create a slick logo for you. You set up your UPS account. You’ve rolled up your sleeves and you’re ready to get started on your ecommerce website.

Maybe you know a guy who’s nephew builds websites from his dorm. Or you read some article on how to build your own website in three easy steps. So now all you have to do is get the website built and you’re good to go, right?

Wrong.

Over the years, I have met too many entrepreneurs trying to build their own websites and too many entrepreneurs whining about the price to build a great website. And it bugs me.

Building a beautifully designed, fully capable website is no longer a luxury if you’re looking to launch or grow any ecommerce business in 2015. It’s a necessity.

Look, I get it. You’re a startup. You have a limited budget. You’re an entrepreneur willing to do things yourself. And that’s all very admirable. But if you’re launching an ecommerce business and you’re unwilling to invest in your website, then you’re better off having never launched your business.

Here’s why. 

You have a single presence. Make it count.

Instead of a website, let’s assume instead you’re opening a new brick-and-mortar clothing store. Since you’re a startup, your shop would likely be small. Your budget for build-out wouldn’t be much. But at a minimum, you still have to pay for paint, flooring, lights, shelves, displays, mannequins, a POS system, an inventory system and quite a few fixtures. Even with just a short one-year lease for retail space, no matter where you open it, you’d still be looking at $100,000 to cover just your physical presence. Probably more.

And even after dropping $100,000, you’d still pale in comparison to the Macy’s down the road from you. Or the Ann Taylor. Or the Men’s Wearhouse. They’d kill you in presentation, assortment and skilled labor. You’d never survive.

But…if you’re building an ecommerce website, customers view you differently. They view you only in the narrow world of online space. They won’t be thinking about what the Macy’s store in their neighborhood looks like. They’ll compare macys.com with your website.

And guess what? Now you have a much better chance in this competition.

While the cost of a good web developer varies, a beautifully designed, fully capable website should cost between $7,000 and $20,000 at most. Now compare that with the $100,000 you’d spend for your brick-and-mortar store — and you’d still lose that battle in every way. So why wouldn’t you spend a few bucks and build a kick-ass website? A website, by the way, that would last far more than a year. 

So what does it mean to have a beautifully designed, fully capable website?

The best place to start when designing your website (both aesthetically and as a utility) is to roam the web seeking out your competitors. What do their sites look like? What do you like most about their design? What do you like least about their design?

Now start looking at sites outside of your competition. Look for anything from a design perspective that appears fresh or unique. I’m building a website now to sell my own line of men’s bedding. Our gallery of thumbnails and product pages were inspired by a website I found dedicated to real estate crowdfunding. A totally different industry, and yet, the design scheme fit perfectly for what I wanted to do.

So after you have the design figured out, then make sure your product photos are professionally taken. Every piece of research I’ve ever read confirms that the nicer your product photography, the higher the conversion rate. And of course, the lower the return rate of your products. Poor photography also intangibly affects your brand. Do yourself a favor and hire a professional photographer.

Now it is time to revisit your competitors and test their navigability. Pretend you’re the consumer. Do the categories make sense? Are there any special features that you love? Is there something you hate? Do you wish it had a certain feature to bridge the gap between shopping in-person vs. shopping online?

A great example is something I had built on The Tie Bar when we launched back in 2004. I always had the hardest time shopping for ties in person without seeing how those ties would look with a particular shirt or suit. And no website out there addressed the problem.

So at The Tie Bar, we built a feature on the site that allowed customers to place our ties against the backgrounds of the most common colored (and patterned) shirts and suits. Back in 2004, it was a novel concept and it got us many compliments and mentions in the press. And all I did was discover a pain point in shopping online for ties and attempted to fix it.

So when building your website, make sure to include the features you love and exclude the features you don’t. And if you can come up with a creative add-on to your site, all the better. 

Mobile

The last point I’ll make is one covered in a million other places, so I will not belabor the point. Just make sure your site is mobile-friendly.

I will not bore you with the stats (which are everywhere) but suffice it to say that if your website does not translate well into an easy and appealing mobile experience, you’re wasting your time investing in your new beautifully-designed, fully capable website I just talked you into.

If you would like Mojoe.net to discuss developing your logo, web site, web application, need custom programming, or IT consultant, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-859-9848 or you can email us at dwerne@mojoe.net.

Article Provided By Entrepreneur

6 Common Misconceptions

Thursday, March 5th, 2015

 

6 Common Misconceptions - Silhouette

6 Common Misconceptions CEOs Have About Web Development

Remember your last web development project? You went over budget, blew past deadlines and became frustrated with just about everyone involved at some point.

The bad news? It was rough.

The really bad news? It was probably your team’s fault.

Most CEOs have serious misconceptions about web development. This is a problem because businesses are more reliant than ever on their online presence. CEOs in companies of all sizes struggle with this. Here are six myths that most CEOs struggle with:

1. Website development is easy.

Clients commonly request a “simple” 20-page website with a log-in setup, online payment, a blog and other widgets.

Websites such as Facebook and Craigslist may appear simple, but the necessary development work is time-consuming and complicated. The strange thing is that the simpler the design, often the more expensive the site is. Some requests that seem small could involve complicated development work and require days of programming.

2. Everyone should be involved.

Rather than packing all the staff into a conference room to rattle off ideas involve only the people who’ll be doing the work.

Compile your content strategy, brand assets, business objectives and user flows. Don’t spend time mulling deep technical planning, database architecture, layouts, designs or widgets.

3. Websites are a commodity.

With the advent of templates, sites like 99designs and offshore development, many businesspeople harbor the misperception that web design is a cheap commodity.

Taking advantage of already created templates might work for some companies, but for those serious about their brand and online presence, such alternatives won’t suffice long-term.

Consider your website an investment and dedicate appropriate resources toward it. Find a team of designers who understands your business, ask the right questions and have happy customers. A good team will help you manage your goals along with your budget and find optimal solutions. It may seem expensive, but the return on investment will be worth it.

4. Once a site is built, it’s done.

Web development isn’t a once-and-done activity. Once your site is launched, it will need to be maintained. Many midmarket companies have round-the-clock teams monitoring their sites to ensure they remain without glitches.

Even if your website doesn’t handle a high volume of traffic, you still need someone keeping an eye on functionality. You’ll also need security updates and fresh content for SEO purposes.

5. Anyone can create a great user experience.

You can’t build the website yourself. Focus on leading your business and improving your products. Your intern, cousin or IT guy can’t build it either. A lot more that goes into a site than basic knowledge of web design, especially when building payment systems and ensuring integration with the company’s internal systems.

There are free website-building tools that can be great for bootstrapped startup or running a small business site. But they aren’t robust enough for the needs of most established businesses.

For your website, you may need a team to design mostly from scratch, which requires a specific skill set. Let the web design firm hired do what it does best, but make sure its staffers are asking the right questions about the target audiences before they start.

6. It’s your website, so you dictate the design.

It’s natural to want to micromanage your company’s website. Unfortunately, unless you’re a web designer, this isn’t the job for you. You need to trust your web designer if you want site visitors to become paying customers.

Web designers will understand your vision, but you need to let them design. They’re knowledgeable about structure and what helps visitors convert into customers.

If you would like Mojoe.net to discuss developing your logo, web site, web application, need custom programming, or IT consultant, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-859-9848 or you can email us at dwerne@mojoe.net.

Article Provided By Entrepreneur

Social Media Strategies

Wednesday, February 25th, 2015

 

Social Media Strategies

Pamela Lund is a well-known PPC marketing specialist, and an upcoming speaker at the SEJ Summit in Santa Monica on February 24thThe conference ticket cost for attendees is being covered by our partner, Searchmetrics, which delivers enterprise SEO and content marketing analysis, recommendations, forecasting and reporting for companies that want potential customers to find them faster.

Want to attend? We still have a few spots open – so if you are in the LA area and want to learn from Pamela (and other speakers like Neil Patel, Stephan Spencer, Morgan Brown, and more), sign up for an invite now. If you aren’t in the LA area, check out where else the SEJ Summit will be this year, including Chicago, NYC, San Francisco, London, and Dallas.

 

We are excited to welcome Pamela next week. and can’t wait to hear what she has to say. But for now, here is some insight from Pamela on PPC and paid social media:

1. Out of all the platforms you run PPC campaigns for clients (AdWords, FB, LinkedIn, Bing, etc), which do you find to have the largest ROI?

As with all things SEM, the answer is it depends.

For e-commerce, the best performing channels in my experience are AdWords and Bing search, including Shopping/Product Listing Ads campaigns. Buyer intent is higher when people are specifically searching your keywords and you can qualify them with the ad message. Shopping ads work particularly well for sellers who have the best prices in their market or unique products that stand out from the competition when users see product images. You can be successful with AdWords and Bing search based ads with almost any budget (within reason).

AdWords and Bing search based ads also work well for lead generation if you have a landing page optimized for converting this type of traffic. Frequently people are in research mode when searching, so you need to give them just enough information to convince them to contact you or offer them something in exchange, such as a relevant white paper, in exchange for submitting their contact information.

Display/banner advertising can work well for almost any business if proper targeting is employed in combination with good banners and a strong landing page. You may want to expect lower performance from display advertising in exchange for the branding you receive. View through conversions can indicate if display advertising is offering any lift in conversions.

Facebook ads and Twitter ads can be successful for e-commerce if you have a product or service that is inexpensive and interesting enough to be an impulse buy and you’re targeting the right audience. In many cases though, I use social network advertising for branding, for giveaways and contests, and for cheap traffic generation so we can tag users with remarketing pixels so we can reach them with ads when they are in a buying mindset. I also usually encourage clients to run a likes/followers ad campaign so we can increase the number of quality fans both for page engagement and branding as well as to improve the data available for building lookalike audiences for ad targeting.

LinkedIn Ads work well for B2B products and services, but usually when used as lead gen with the actual sale happening through an email drip or personal contact. The LinkedIn Ads platform offers fantastic targeting options if you know the job title of your decision maker or if you are trying to reach people who work in certain industries. Unfortunately, the minimum CPC is $2 so if you do not convert well or have a high CPA threshold, the leads may be too expensive. Volume is also a limiting factor for LinkedIn Ads.

For app installs, Twitter and Facebook ads perform well. If the app is free, the conversion rates can be phenomenal. You need to have some form of app analytics implemented to track the quality of the installs to optimize your targeting for the long-term, but if sheer volume of installs/user signups is the goal, such as with start-ups raising funding, social ads are a good approach.

2. What types of companies should focus more on paid social campaigns via paid search?

Companies trying to boost app installs, grow fan engagement, build remarketing audience size, or building buzz for an upcoming offering will most likely have better results from social advertising than from paid search. Anything with a social component will also work well if you are targeting users in the network you want them to use to share your content. For instance, if you are running a contest that people get an extra entry to if they share your content, they will be more likely to share it if it is as easy as possible. So, targeting people within Facebook with a request to share a Facebook post will be more successful than targeting people with an AdWords ad that links to your website with a request to share the page on a social network.

Companies that have a longer buying cycle or those that get repeat purchases from their users tend to see a significant boost in conversions if they incorporate social network advertising in their overall strategy because they keep the brand in the user’s consciousness. Even if the conversions don’t come from clicks on the social ads, the consistent reminders bring users back for future purchases. Just like television advertising doesn’t cause people to immediately get in the car and drive to the store to buy a product, it influences their buying decision next time they are shopping.

Any business that has a strong social presence can also be successful advertising on social networks. Without a strong social presence (active Facebook page or Twitter stream), the advertising may not be as effective as people tend to look for multiple cues before buying.

3. When I do PPC campaigns for clients, writing “perfect” ad copy can get tedious. Can you give us a few strategies for writing ad copy?

Good PPC managers are a wonderfully crazy bunch. We have to have a bit of a split personality in order to be successful at and enjoy our jobs. That being said, optimizing ad copy can be tedious, especially if you’ve been working on an account for a while and think you’ve tested everything that can be tested. However, there are always new things to try. Some of my favorite tips are:

  • When writing ads for a new client, read their website to get comfortable with any language specific to their business, ask the client to describe their product to you in their own words, read their competitors’ ads and websites, and read forums or product reviews to see how consumers refer to the product. Use phrases that the consumers use, even if your client doesn’t use them. You’re not trying to get your client to click the ad, you’re trying to attract buyers.
  • When writing new ads, don’t try to change every piece of the ad. You only need to change one line, and sometimes only one word, to have a significant impact on performance. If you change too many variables at once, you won’t know what caused the change in CTR or conversion rate and you’ll use up all your good ideas in one ad. Instead, try a new headline or change the context (use an exclamation instead of a question).
  • Don’t try to be too clever with text ads. You have a split second to get people to pay attention and decide to click. Never underestimate the value of just telling people what to do, such as “Buy Now To Save 20%.”
  • The formula of “ask a question and solve the problem” works well in most industries. If you ask the right question to the right audience and have the right solution, you will get a good CTR and conversion rate. If someone is searching for a roofer you might show them an ad that says “Need A New Roof? Mention This Ad For $250 Off.” Needing a new roof is their problem and giving them $250 off a new one is your solution.

4. What made you decide to specialize on PPC instead of trying to focus on multiple areas of marketing?

I love SEM because I get to do something different every day, even if I’m working on the same accounts for extended periods of time. There are so many facets to internet advertising from keyword research to writing ad copy to data analysis to audience identification that it never gets boring. I also love the instant gratification you get with advertising. I can put up a campaign and have data within minutes. Not that I ever obsessively refresh the Google Analytics real-time reports right after launching new campaigns. Nope, I never do that.

And if I’m being honest, I have absolutely no website design ability nor do I have the patience to chase search engine algorithms by doing SEO. My skills just fit perfectly with advertising management.

5. I’m always trying to create a dialogue about women in search marketing since we are usually the minority. What are three tactics you can give to new women search professionals trying to make a name for themselves in the search industry?

This is the hardest question in this interview by far because my first instinct is to say “Don’t think of yourself as a woman in the search industry.” I’ll quote my friend Rae Hoffman who has written on this issue and has somehow done a much better job of conveying how I feel about it than I can:

“Be yourselves, never see being a woman as a disadvantage, an advantage or above all, an excuse.”

That being said, here are a few tips for anyone of any gender in any industry, mostly geared towards freelancers:

  • Network with people who do something other than what you do. You’re more likely to get referrals from people who aren’t your competition than people who are. Yes, I refer work to other SEM agencies and those agencies refer to me but the majority of my referrals come from SEOs, web designers, and happy clients. It’s important to know people who do the same thing you do so you can ask them questions when you have a problem, but if you’re trying to grow your profile, network with other people, too. Yes, that includes people who aren’t even in the search industry.
  • Be trustworthy and be a resource for others. If you develop a reputation for being honest and trustworthy, people will be more likely to recommend you for jobs and will be more interested in what you have to say, leading to more speaking engagements, blogging opportunities, or other exposure.
  • Don’t trash your competition to get ahead. This is a small industry and whatever you say will get back to whomever you say it about. Just don’t be that person. You’re better than that. If you aren’t, become better than that.
  • Charge what you’re worth and stand behind your prices. If you aren’t confident about your rates, your clients won’t be either. If a client doesn’t think you’re worth what you’re charging, rather than reducing your rates to keep them, let them go so you will have time to work on a project that pays you what you’re worth. Now, if none of your clients think you’re worth what you’re charging, you may need to look at the value you’re providing.
  • Don’t work with clients you don’t like or for businesses you morally disagree with.You will perform much better for clients you enjoy working for and will do a much better job of selling products you believe in.

If you would like Mojoe.net to discuss developing your logo, web site, web application, need custom programming, or IT consultant, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-859-9848 or you can email us at dwerne@mojoe.net.

Article Provided By Search Engine Journal

Better Emails

Friday, February 20th, 2015

How to Easily Write Better Emails [Infographic]

Better Emails

Learning to write Better Emails makes for good etiquette. Email has become the primary way most of us communicate in the business world — so much so that it often replaces face-to-face interactions. Just think about how many people you’ve emailed, but never actually met.

This is especially common for marketers today. For example, as a blogger who manages contributors, sets up interviews, and coordinates across teams, I send a lot of emails to people who’ve never met me. To them, my emails are their first (and second, and third) impressions of me. How I address them, the way I word a request, and even my email address affects that impression.

The same is true for marketing emails. Whether recipients are long-time customers or brand new blog subscribers, each and every email you send makes an impression and shapes the way they’ll think of you and interact with you in the future.

So, given the chance to learn how to write better emails, wouldn’t you take it? Check out the infographic below from WhoIsHostingThis.com for ways to craft compelling emails so you can build better relationships with your customers and prospects.

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write-better-emails-infographic

If you would like Mojoe.net to discuss developing your logo, web site, web application, need custom programming, or IT consultant, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-859-9848 or you can email us at dwerne@mojoe.net.

Article Provided By HubSpot Blogs

Digital Footprint – Cracking the Code

Friday, February 21st, 2014

Cracking the Code: Web Design and how it affects Your Firm’s Digital Footprint

Digital Footprint, Mojoe.net

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tips and Practices for understanding your digital footprint

The creation and marketing of a Web Site for a Law Firm’s is a unique type of undertaking. Law firms unfortunately are restricted as I am sure most of you are well aware of when it comes to advertising, endorsements and discussing cases. This does not make marketing a law firm services and identity an easy task.

And now you have to contend with your firm’s digital footprint and brand identity that has been released out into cyberspace, people are constantly dreaming up new ways to hijack your brand and siphon off its value. From phishing attacks to counterfeit domains and bogus Facebook accounts, each new digital channel quickly attracts its share of “black hat” operators. In conjunction your firm has to combat anonymous complaints because of your firm’s web site and its content.

(Note: This situation will get more complicated in the coming years due to the gTLD program which will create 1800 new domain name extensions.)

So how do you establish your firm’s digital footprint while still adhering to the rules?

The expansion of social interaction, email, web sites, smart phones, tablets, and e-blast have driven down cost, but in-turn created a global audience and have given multiple ways to reach clients.

So how do you as marketing professionals measure and develop a digital reputation for your law firm that shares excellent resources and presents a compelling narrative for learning more so a client or potential client can make an informed decision about who your law firm is and what services your law firm offers.

Which you hope will prompt them to perform a call to action, that creates business for your firm. That is quantifiable.

So, what is your firm’s digital footprint and what is the message your firm’s digital footprint is conveying?

How big is your brand’s digital footprint? Likely bigger than you think Geographic or country domains, email addresses, Twitter handles, Facebook pages, LinkedIn pages, mobile apps, blogs—many brands have all of these and more.

Here are some basic tools you can use to get a better understanding of your firm’s digital footprint.

So now you have an understanding of your digital footprint.

  • You may have a footprint
  • You may have a partial footprint
  • Your footprint may belong to someone else
  • Your footprint maybe small
  • Your potential footprint maybe extremely large

Depending upon whether your firm’s digital footprint is easy to find, difficult to find or there was nothing to find, gets back to how you market your firm’s web site and its digital presence.

Social Media is one of the most effective ways to manage and promote your digital footprint as well as increase business. Using the following tools can make your firm’s digital footprint easier to manage and maintain. You can also manage your firm’s overall message while making sure to stay within the rules and keep your disclaimer easily accessible.

Search Engine Optimization and Registration the ongoing battle

One of the most overlooked or under-utilized tools for sharing a part of your firm’s digital footprint is search engine optimization and search engine registration. Good and effective SEO is not done only once but is a constant ongoing battle. You have to wage a word WAR in order to accomplish effective SEO placement.

Here is a list of correct common practices that all web site should do for effective optimization

  • Content Creation with Keyword Strategy
  • Google Keyword Planner Tool
  • Deep Linking
  • Alt Tags
  • Title Tags
  • H1 Tags
  • Meta Tags
  • Sitemap.xml
  • Robots.txt file
  • Blogs
  • SEO Plugins and Modules
  • Wikipedia Page

Once you have completed optimization of your site; you need to be sure to register your site every 30 to 90 days with all 30,000 search engines and link directories.

Be sure to continue the battle for your digital footprint (Initial Keyword Strategy)

  • Blog Post
  • Social Post
  • New Page Creation
  • All Digital Content

Analytics and what it means to your firms marketing efforts

Now you have all of this incoming traffic from multiple sources all being directed back to your firm’s web site. You NOW have all of this great analytical data, but what does it mean to you and how can you show the benefit to the rest of the firm.

(Slide 15 Analytics Logos)
Make sure that you have some type of tracking software installed into your site. We prefer Google Analytics because it is free and it offers so much analytical information. There are other analytical engines out there.  Suggested analytics tracking programs that can be installed on your web site.

Looking at Statistics can make your head swim and it is easy to get confused when looking at Google Analytics. There is so much analytical data to sort through that it can seem overwhelming.

Understanding and discerning the statistical information in Google Analytics can be simplified, by breaking it down into the 5 main categories:

  • Real-Time
  • Audience
  • Acquisition
  • Behavior
  • Conversion

Real time, tracks actual visitors on your site, live in real time. You can break that information down into locations, traffic sources, content, events, and conversions.

The audience section will break down the demographics, interest, geo, behavior, technology, mobile, custom and visitors flow. The last two categories have been newly added in the last 6 months. Each one of these sub categories can be broken down even further. The main statistical sections you want to look at are the Overview and Mobile.

  • Overview*
  • Demographics
  • Interests
  • Geo*
  • Behavior*
  • Technology
  • Mobile*
  • Custom
  • Visitors Flow

This section will tell you where your traffic is coming from, whether it is organic, direct, ad words, social, ad word campaigns, or paid search. It is broken into the following sub sections:

  • Overview
  • Channels
  • All Traffic*
  • All Referrals*
  • Campaigns
  • Keywords
  • Cost Analysis
  • Ad Words
  • Social
  • Search Engine Optimization

Behavior is another main section that has a great amount of statistical data, however there are only a couple of sub sections, which are important in helping you determining your traffics behavior. Understanding which pages are attracting traffic to your site and what pages your traffic is leaving your web site. This is critical to the continued health of your firm’s web site.

Overview
Behavior Flow
Site Content*
Site Speed
Site Search
Events
AdSense
Experiments
In-Page Analytics*

Conversions are combined user interaction information with Google Ad words. This section can be extremely important if you are running a Google Ad word campaign and spending ad dollars with Google. This metric will show you conversions from your ad word campaign to a quantifiable action on your web site.

Bringing this all together… Getting a clear view of your digital footprint and taking the necessary steps to optimize your site along with analysis can seem daunting, not least of all because the digital landscape is changing so quickly. However, with the right partner you can ensure that you are prioritizing the actions best suited for your law firm’s digital footprint.

Website Commenting

Thursday, January 9th, 2014

Website commenting, What is it? Why should you or your developer comment your code of your website?

Well, the simple answer is basically commenting or annotations are directions left by developers in the code that they develop. This can be very useful and instructional for website projects that have more than one developer, for websites that are extremely large or for websites that have complicated functions. These comments can speed up trouble shooting, adding additional functions to a website, or expanding a website.

Commenting inside the code can also be very useful and save a great deal of time and money if you have to move your site from one development company to another.

Now, that you have a basic understanding of  having commenting inside your website. Let’s actually take a look at commenting the code of your website.

EXAMPLE 1 Cascading Style Sheet

#wrapper{
	width:950px;
	height:100%;
	margin:15px auto;
	border:10px solid #000;
	background-color:#fff;
	overflow:auto;
}

Example 1 above is what is called a DIV tag inside a Cascading Style Sheet. This DIV controls the width and

height of the wrapper in also sets the margin, border, background color and whether the wrapper should overflow its pre-determined width and height. There is no comment with this statement. In the next Example; you will see the comment that belongs with this piece of code.

EXAMPLE  2

/* The wrapper below controls the entire site main layout and it also sets the width, 
height, margin, border, background color and the overflow. This is universal for the 
entire site and used globally */

#wrapper{
	width:950px;
	height:100%;
	margin:15px auto;
	border:10px solid #000;
	background-color:#fff;
	overflow:auto;
}

Your entire website should always be commented from the Cascading Style Sheet, Javascript, Jquery, HTML, or any programming language that has been used to develop your website. This is something that most developers do not do for their clients, but this is something you should always ask for when getting a website developed. It is always overlooked and most customers do not know to even ask about commenting.

If you would like Mojoe.net to discuss developing your web site, web application, need custom programming, or IT consultant, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-859-9848 or you can email us at dwerne@mojoe.net

WordPress Web Site – Cox Photo

Tuesday, December 3rd, 2013

WordPress Web Site - Cox Photography
Mojoe.net has launched a new WordPress web site for Patrick Cox Photography. Mojoe.net is very honored to launch www.coxphotography.net. Not only did we consult with Patrick on the development of his site in WordPress but this site is  a fully responsive WordPress web site but with an added twist.

The images on the home page fill the screen up no matter what the device: desktop, tablet or mobile phone. The site and the images are optimized for improved performance on mobile devices like tablets and phones. Patrick wanted a site that would not only be easy to update by using WordPress as his Content Management System but wanted a site that would show the beauty, technique and creativity that he puts into each and every shot.

We customize the site to display full screen images on any page of the site but we also customized the WordPress login screen especially for Patrick Cox Photography. This site has been developed with its own unique navigation for the home page and draws upon a plugin that has been customized to deliver the experience that Patrick Cox Photography wanted to achieve when visitors come to his web site.

Cox Photography is the premier photographer in Greenville, South Carolina and has been published in major magazine and publications.

Services Provided:

If you would like Mojoe.net to discuss developing your web site, web application, need custom programming, or IT consultant, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-859-9848 or you can email us at dwerne@mojoe.net

Web Design Greenville SC | Mojoe Blog is proudly powered by WordPress | Entries (RSS) and Comments (RSS).

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