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Is Pinterest Traffic Worthless?

Tuesday, May 12th, 2015

Is Pinterest Traffic Worthless?

 

Recently while researching different avenues in social media I came across an article by Tony Clark ” Is Pinterest Traffic Worthless? “. I thought it was a good read for anyone looking to add Pinterest to their Social Media Marketing strategy. With that in mind I would like to thank our friends at Copyblogger for their continuing efforts to share knowledge that makes everyone’s life easier.

Is Pinterest Traffic Worthless?

You’ve seen tons of articles raving about it.

How it’s driving more traffic than anything in the known universe. How you need to be “pinning” and have “pinnable stuff” or you’re going to fail at this magical new social network. How it’s the greatest thing since, well, the last greatest thing.

And you want someone to be straight with you. So here’s the truth …

Pinterest traffic is worthless.

But so is all traffic — unless you do something with it.

Seeing patterns that aren’t there

The problem with most of what’s being written about Pinterest traffic is that it’s pointing out the wrong things. What passes for “reporting” is someone opening Google Analytics, seeing a spike in referrals from Pinterest, and writing an “OMG! Lots of Traffic” post.

Very few are taking the time to do any due diligence on the larger picture.

Are people clicking through, or is the “traffic” just a remote call to the pinned image? Where are your visitors going? What are they doing? Does the traffic convert?

You have to ask real questions, and look for real answers, not patterns based on what others think they’re seeing.

And the wonderful thing about running a business online is that almost everything is testable, trackable, and adjustable.

What’s really going on with Pinterest traffic?

Data doesn’t lie (at least when you’re using it correctly).

Understanding your data — traffic, patterns, and conversions — is critical to your content marketing strategy. Especially when it comes to a new traffic source.

At Copyblogger Media, much of what we do is guided by data — traffic patterns, market analysis, feedback, customer input, and conversion scenarios.

And the increased Pinterest traffic we receive is treated no differently.

We watch, track, analyze, and correlate to figure out how best to capitalize on this new traffic source. Here are a few things we’ve discovered …

Traffic:

  • In the last three months (Jan 1-Mar 28), Pinterest helped traffic grow on each of our sites.
  • For Copyblogger, Pinterest was the #3 referring website, bested only by Facebook and Twitter.
  • Between January 1st and March 5th, when the 15 Grammar Goofs That Make You Look Silly infographic was posted, Pinterest sent close to 15,000 visits. Based on the number of times it was pinned, this told us that fewer than half of the people who pinned the image actually clicked through.
  • In the week following that infographic, Pinterest sent 2.7 times as much traffic as the three months before.
  • Individual post activity seems to hold a long shelf life when it’s popular on Pinterest. Often, a tweet is lifeless within a day, where a pin can continue pulling traffic for weeks after being published.
  • During this same three-month period, Pinterest was the #29 referring site for StudioPress.
  • While the amount of raw Pinterest traffic — the number of visits — is smaller for StudioPress than for Copyblogger, visitors to StudioPress stay much longer and visit more pages on average. For example, the average visit duration for a Pinterest-referred visitor on Copyblogger is 0:00:32, compared to an average of 0:05:28 on StudioPress.
  • Pinterest visitors check out 1.16 pages on average after clicking through to Copyblogger, compared to 6.34 pages on StudioPress.
  • The bounce rate for Pinterest visitors on Copyblogger averages out to 91.7%, StudioPress is 49.9% on average. This is much higher than our site averages, and higher than most other traffic sources.

Visitor Flow:

  • Infographic pins have exceptionally high bounce rates and very short visits, usually less than a minute. However, other pins (such as the 56 Ways to Market Your Business on Pinterest post) that led to straight copy had much longer visits and lower bounce rates.
  • On that Pinterest marketing post, the majority went on to the main page, followed by the Internet Marketing for Smart People, Genesis, and SEO site quality pages.
  • On days when Pinterest activity was particularly high, traffic increased to each of our product sites from Copyblogger.
  • 89.6% of Pinterest-referred visitors to Copyblogger were new to the site. Only 44.4% of Pinterest referrals on StudioPress brought new visitors.
  • The StudioPress top Pinterest-pulling post included an infographic about How Developers are Driving the Business Adoption of WordPress.
  • The vast majority of other StudioPress popular pins were all themes or showcase websites. These pins, on average, showed very low bounce and exit rates, with most continuing on to the themes page, the showcase, the blog, or the features page.
  • On average, they also showed fewer new visitors, which historically correlates with low bounce rates on our properties.

OK, so what does all of this mean for you?

In short, it means:

 

  • You need to have specific goals for using the traffic from Pinterest.
  • Work with the traffic as you would from any source — driving it to landing pages and through a conversion path.

 

For example, we’ve optimized certain pages on Copyblogger to drive visitors to our list and product pages. We’ve found that the traffic from Pinterest can be also driven to those sources, if a clear call to action is present.

On StudioPress, optimizing showcase pages to drive traffic to the related themes has shown an increase of on-page time and conversions — especially for repeat visitors.

So, even though the traffic from Pinterest for StudioPress was much lower than for Copyblogger, the overall bounce rate was also lower, on-page time was higher, and conversions were better because the path was more predictable.

Armed with that data, we can better utilize the traffic on all of our sites through tracking and testing.

And so can you.

Our analysis shows us a number of best practices for converting Pinterest traffic:

  • Infographics and smaller images command more click-throughs because they’re unreadable from the Pinterest site.
  • Infographic headlines are key to getting people to click through.
  • Compelling subjects covered with too-small-for-Pinterest font choices are ideal.
  • People who do move around your site upon arrival will likely follow a predictable path (for example: a showcase theme pin leads to a page path that is more likely to start with the themes gallery than the blog).
  • You can control how traffic responds by making a specific call to action on your pin’s landing page.
  • Longer visits on pins that bring repeat traffic is an important metric, since on commerce-driven sites you may need to get someone to your page a few times before they buy.
  • Pinterest doesn’t sell stuff — you do. By funneling the traffic properly, you can convert visitors into customers.

Traffic from any source is only worthwhile if you have specific goals for it. You can use Pinterest for customer engagement, personal branding, or as an entry point to your conversion funnel.

But you need to understand what your traffic is doing in order to accomplish those goals. That’s where your data comes in. (And if you’re looking for a place to start, try Avinash Kaushik’s Web Analytics: An Hour A Day).

So is Pinterest traffic worthless? That’s up to you to find out.

 

Article Provided By Copyblogger

If you would like Mojoe.net to discuss developing your web security, logo, web site, web application, custom programming, or need an IT consultant, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-859-9848 or you can email us at dwerne@mojoe.net.

Did you like this article? Here is another you may like to read.

What is Pinterest and why should I care? - Pinterest

 

 

 

 

 

What is Pinterest and why should I care?

Thursday, May 7th, 2015

PinterestWhat is Pinterest and why should I care?

Once you’ve got a Pinterest account, you can create online collages (“boards”) for different topics you’re interested in, and then add images and videos to your boards by “pinning” them (the equivalent of using glue sticks on old-school vision boards, but faster, slicker, and considerably cooler.)

Pinterest has nearly five million users, and is rapidly growing. Nearly 1.5 million unique users visit Pinterest daily, spending an average of 15 minutes a day on the site.

Think those inspiring vision boards don’t result in referral traffic to websites and blogs? Think again. In January 2012, Pinterest drove greater traffic to websites than LinkedIn, Google Plus, Reddit, and Youtube — combined.

I’ve been doing a lot of thinking about how beginner, intermediate, and black-belt Pinterest users are using it to grow their businesses and connect with their customers using these appealing online collages.

Here are 56 powerful ways to incorporate Pinterest into your content marketing mix …

Pinterest marketing for beginner pinners …

  1. Make sure you feature your business name on your profile for maximum exposure. Use your business name as your username, or change your profile name to your business name after your profile is set up.
  2. Add a paragraph about who you are and what you’re interested in to the “About” section on your Pinterest profile. It will show up right under your photo, and will be one way that users can find out more about you.
  3. Connect your account with your Facebook and Twitter accounts. Not only will it help you gain followers, but making this connection adds social media icons under your profile picture that link to your Facebook and Twitter profiles.
  4. Don’t forget to add your website URL in your profile, too!
  5. Pin lots of stuff. Pin content steadily, instead of in huge bursts, to maximize your exposure and engagement.
  6. Come up with creative and interesting board names. They get shared whenever you pin something, so make them enticing. But be creative — you need to keep your board names short. There isn’t a lot of room for long descriptive titles.
  7. Tag other Pinterest users in your pins by using “@username” in your descriptions. Network with other professionals and vendors in your field by using this feature. Not many people are doing this yet, so it’s a great way to build your following and stand out.
  8. Comment on other people’s pins. Just like with tagging, this feature hasn’t really caught on yet, so use it regularly to really engage with other users. Obviously, use the same good manners and common sense you would when commenting on a blog or other social media site.
  9. “Like” other people’s pins to give a thumbs-up when you want to recognize great content.
  10. Pin from lots of different sources, instead of just from one or two sites. Variety is important on Pinterest.
  11. Mix pinning your own unique finds with doing lots of “repinning,” which is repeating someone else’s pin to your followers (just like a Retweet on Twitter). The person whose image you repin gets notified via email, and they also get a credit on your pin, which increases their following.
  12. Feel free to pin your own blog posts, but don’t over-promote. Follow the usual etiquette rules of any other social media site, and don’t be the boorish one at the party who only talks about himself.
  13. Pin videos! Pinterest has a special section just for pinned videos, and there are far fewer videos than images on Pinterest at this point, so use them to distinguish yourself. Any YouTube video is easy to pin.
  14. When you pin an image, add a description under it. Be smart about these descriptions — a good description will stay with an image as it gets repinned all over the Pinterest world. If the image is something from your own site, definitely use your business name in the description.
  15. After you pin a new image using the very handy Pinterest browser bookmarklet (a great tool in its own right,) use its built-in social media prompts to re-share your pin on Twitter and Facebook, too.
  16. Use Pinterest’s embed option to publish pins as content in your blog posts and website pages. Note: As Pinterest is catching on, you may need to tell your users that they need to click on a Pinterest image to get to the original source. When I tried this last week, a reader wrote to me and asked, “Is there more to that Pin thing? Or is it just a pretty image?”
  17. Get the Pinterest iPhone app, so you can repin on the go, pin from your camera and add a location to your pins so others can find your images.
  18. Optimize your website content for Pinterest sharing (Part One): Use images in every single post you write, so your post can be shared on Pinterest. When you find yourself getting lazy about this, remember –- not using an image in your post means no one will pin it. And remember — the prettier the picture is, the more it will get pinned. The images that appeal to Pinterest members are powerful and emotive, so keep that in mind when choosing your pictures. That combination tends to work well for your blog readers, too.
  19. Optimize your website content for Pinterest sharing (Part Two): Consider watermarking your images, or adding text to them. If you’re using your own images on Pinterest, one of the best ways to help your image stand out is by adding a clear description to the image itself, or adding a watermark with your business name. Make sure it’s clear, but that it doesn’t block out the main subject of the photo.
  20. Create seasonal or holiday boards that relate to your brand. Example: New Year’s Resolutions, Fourth of July, etc. Users love these.
  21. Add a prominent Follow Me on Pinterest button to your website to advertise that you’re a pinner!

Pinterest marketing for intermediate pinners …

  1. Search for new images to pin (or for trends) by using Pinterest’s search function. The search bar is in the top left of every Pinterest page.
  2. Use keywords in descriptions of pins, so pinners can find your images and boards when they do their own searches.
  3. Make sure you’ve got a Pin It! button added to the footer of each of your blog posts so your readers can quickly and easily share your content on Pinterest.
  4. Your Pinterest page has its own RSS feed! Find your Pinterest feed by clicking on the RSS symbol under your profile photo, then use it anywhere you can use a feed (Facebook, LinkedIn, for syndication on other sites, etc.) Advertise your Pinterest feed to your readers and ask them to add you to their RSS feedreaders.
  5. Got a WordPress site? Feature your recent pins in a widget in your WordPress sidebar by using a Pinterest widget.
  6. You can add contributors to any of your boards. Use this feature to engage your staff and let them contribute to your Pinterest presence by using adding to your company boards. Your staff will love this, and your boards will be richer for it!
  7. Want to find out who’s been pinning your stuff? Go to:http://pinterest.com/source/yoursitehere. For an example, check out Copyblogger’s source page. Look at your site’s page often to discover which posts and images are resonating with Pinterest users. Use that information to shape your content strategy.
  8. Add prices to your pins to create your own Pinterest shop. To add a price to a pin, type the $ or £ symbol followed by item’s price in the pin’s description. When you add prices to your pins, they may be featured in Pinterest’s “Gifts” section.
  9. Create a board that tells the story of your company and communicates your core values. Make this board available to people as part of your sales process.
  10. Consider creating “thank you” boards for current or past clients that send special appreciative messages. Could you create a holiday thank you card? Or one that celebrate the launch of a new client’s big project with your company?
  11. Pin tutorials on your boards. Need to walk a client through how to use your products or services? Or do you want to create free how-to videos to use as promotional materials? Pin your videos and presentations on special “How-To” or “Tutorial” boards. Anything you teach your clients can be made into a tutorial.
  12. Watch for trends. Click on the “Popular” link on your Pinterest home page to research what’s catching on with pinners, then integrate those trends into your content strategy.
  13. Be yourself. Pinterest is all about personal expression, so don’t be afraid to pin stuff that represents who you really are.
  14. Create a special board to highlight your company’s team members. Use the description under each photo to write a bio of each person.
  15. Show behind-the-scenes photos of your company. People love knowing how you make things!
  16. Become an information curator for your niche. Gather the newest and best resources on your boards. Become a trusted source of information on Pinterest, and your following will grow by leaps and bounds.
  17. Integrate your Pinterest account with Facebook’s timeline feature, so you post content in both places at once.
  18. Highlight old content on your blog so that people can repin your archived posts. The LinkWithin tool will add a footer to your blog posts that features images and links pulled from old content, giving people the opportunity to pin previous articles.
  19. Thinking about freshening up old photos, or going back through your blog archives and adding photos to those text-only posts? Now is the time! Remember — the prettier the picture, the more pins you will get.

Pinterest marketing for black-belt pinners …

  1. Find out when you’re getting the most repins, likes, comments and referral traffic by regularly analyzing both your Pinterest profile and your site traffic stats. Test out pinning on different days of the week and times of day to maximize traffic and audience engagement.
  2. Connect your clients who use Pinterest by introducing them to each other. Recognize your best pinners by sending out a weekly “Best of Pinterest” email that includes spotlighted boards and pins from your clients’ profiles.
  3. Create moderated boards for your fans to express their support for you. They can add videos, blog posts and photos from your events.
  4. Do you have a number of different ideal client personas? Create a separate board to represent each client persona, then use those boards during your sales cycle and embed them into your website pages so people are clear about the kinds of clients you’re trying to attract.
  5. Create boards for the classes and webinars you teach, and use them as supplemental material for your students. You can use the boards during your class or presentation, or send your students home with Pinterest boards to explore after class. If you’re teaching a live class or workshop, include pictures from the actual event.
  6. Create boards for referral sources, affiliates and strategic partners, and let them add to the boards. Engage with the partners so they know they are included and appreciated.
  7. Allow your best customers or star students to join in on certain boards and pin ideas and suggestions about how to use your product, or themes that go along with your products and services.
  8. What could be better for showcasing how awesome your business is than creating a dedicated testimonials board?
  9. Use Pinterest boards to tell client stories. Turn boring written case studies into powerful visual stories.
  10. Check out your VIP clients’ boards to get ideas for special thank you or holiday gifts.
  11. Create quick-start guides or owner’s manual boards for your products. Or if you’re primarily a service provider, create a “How to Get the Most Out of Working with Me” board with ideas and suggestions on maximizing your service relationship.
  12. Create boards for conferences that you attend. Carry cards with instructions on getting invited to post on that board — conference attendees will love this!
  13. Create beautiful, visually interesting coupons, and add them to your boards.
  14. Your clients will be blown away if you create special boards just for them that include resources and ideas tailored to their individual situations. This will really make your company shine is done regularly and well.
  15. Offer exclusive Pinterest promotions. Create pins that give special promotions for following you on Pinterest.
  16. Run a Pinterest contest. Invite your readers to pin links and images from your site that inspire, motivate, move or entertain them. Then judge the winners by creativity or ingenuity and offer a juicy prize. Offer to promote the winners’ Pinterest boards on your site as part of the contest.

Article Provided By Copyblogger

If you would like Mojoe.net to discuss developing your web security, logo, web site, web application, custom programming, or need an IT consultant, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-859-9848 or you can email us at dwerne@mojoe.net.

Did you like this article? Here is another you may like to read.

Is Pinterest Traffic Worthless? - puzzle

  • Is Pinterest Traffic Worthless?

Data-Driven or Problem-Driven

Tuesday, February 3rd, 2015

Don’t be Data-Driven, be Problem-Driven

Are you Data-Driven or Problem-Driven?

Data-Driven or Problem-Driven - enthusiasm

Recently a founder of an early stage startup asked me, “How do I convince my co-founder and team to be more data-driven?”

I think I surprised him with my answer, because I told him that the key issue wasn’t being more data-driven, it was being problem-driven. Or more specifically, problem-aligned.

Being data-driven (or at least data-informed as we say in Lean Analytics), is entirely dependent on whether you (read: startup founders) agree on the problem that you’re solving. If you can’t agree, data is meaningless.

Analytics is the measurement of movement towards business goals.

When speaking with this founder it was fairly clear to me that he and his co-founder didn’t actually agree on what they should be doing. That’s very common amongst founders, and it’s the biggest challenge you’ll face. Startups die regularly because of founder disagreement. You don’t always hear about it, but that’s what’s happening behind the scenes.

Once you’ve agreed on the key problem that you need to address (recognizing that there are always tons of issues at any given point in time, but focus is a must), the data flows naturally from there. It becomes much easier to figure out what to track when you know what problem you’re trying to solve.

If your co-founder doesn’t want to use data once you have agreement on the problem to focus on, you have another issue. In my opinion it’s one of intellectual honesty (or lack thereof). When someone doesn’t want to use data to know if they’re making progress towards business goals (read: solving problems) then they’re trying to insulate themselves from reality. That’s a dangerous place to be.

Get alignment on the key problems you need to solve before worrying about anything else. Make sure everyone at your startup is working together and feels responsible for solving the key problems you’ve agreed upon. Focusing on the data or “being data-driven” is a moot point if people aren’t working together on the right priorities.

 

If you would like Mojoe.net to discuss developing your logo, web site, web application, need custom programming, or IT consultant, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-859-9848 or you can email us at dwerne@mojoe.net

Article Provided by Instigator Blog

Five Content Marketing Metric

Thursday, January 29th, 2015

 

Five Content Marketing Metrics-Five Content

On September 24th I had the opportunity to participate in a webinar hosted by David Malmborg from Right Intel. We discussed five important data points that are really good leading indicators of your eventual success (or unfortunate misfires) in content marketing. These are important metrics, but too many companies don’t pay any attention to them.(Five Content Marketing Metric)

First off, I want to mention a caveat that these are not the most important metrics to track – revenue, leads, and metrics that directly impact a business’s bottom line clearly outweigh these metrics. The metrics I’m covering here are some fun and rarely-used metrics that are fascinating to track and can have a powerful influence on the quality and direction of your content marketing.

We covered them all in detail, which you can hear in the webinar replay, but I thought it would be valuable to go over each metric here to provide an overview and suggest some strategies for using them to build your campaign. Here are the Five Content Marketing Metrics You Don’t Know But Should.

1.  Social Momentum of Your Website

The most common measurement of social growth and engagement is through a snapshot of how many shares/likes/+1s/etc. any given content piece receives. There are a lot of tools that can help you gather that information, and many companies use them regularly, but the overall social trend is where you will find some really valuable data.

Five Content Marketing Metrics-Social Media trend

By looking at your content on a URL-by-URL and month-to-month basis, you get a real feel for the actual momentum of your content strategy. You don’t want to focus strictly on your homepage or your latest blog post, though. Look at it site wide, as an aggregate, to see the big picture.

This will help you discover what is stagnant and what is getting the most attention. You can then use the data to determine why some things are performing better than others, and then make the necessary changes to improve your overall campaign. This will help you ride the wave, find the momentum, and really see a difference.

There are a couple simple steps to determine how the social engagement with your website is trending.

  • Compile Website URLs (using tools like Screaming Frog, XML sitemaps, etc)
  • Store Website URLs (see the presentation for suggestions on the best tools to use)
  • Repeat the analysis on a monthly basis

2.  Social Momentum of External Content

While it’s important to know how users are responding to the content on your site, it’s just as important to know how they’re engaging with the materials you’re publishing all over the web. You can go a step beyond that, though, and look at how the competition is using content to reach the same target audience.

Five Content Marketing Metrics-Competitive social momentum

Most of the process here is much the same as it was for tracking social trends on your own site. It begins with:

  • Compile URLs (Right Intel, Screaming Frog, BuzzStream, and other tools are useful options)
  • Store URLs (same as above)
  • Analyze for new opportunities every month

3.  Competitive Blog Content Strategies

Sometimes you need to track more than your own content and pay attention to the share metrics of competitive URLs. Take note of their blog post frequency and the times of day and week when content is published and compare it all to your own content strategy to determine if you’re missing some opportunities.

You can track many of these metrics using tools like RSS Feed Social Share, Right Intel Content Curation, or SEO.com RSS Feed Chrome extension (coming soon).

4.  New Links Generated (Monthly)

Most companies will work hard to keep track of the total number of links pointing at their site, but you can learn more about the current conversation going on around your company by focusing more on the links that have appeared in the last month. This way you can stay on top of developments and find new opportunities for social outreach and content partnerships. The process for determining the newest is quite simple:

  • Export your links every month with your favorite tool (Site Explorer, Majestic, SEO.com Insights, etc. are all valid choices)
  • Dedupe this month’s report with last month’s to separate the new and old (check the webinar for tools to help dedupe)

5.  Site Speed

This might be one of the most underrated metric s, despite regular reminders that it is an important website ranking element. According to Searchmetrics, it’s only getting more important. We’ve already discussed some of their other conclusions about content quality, but one of the more technical aspects that they get into is the loading speed of the site.

Five Content Marketing Metrics-Sites speed metric

Just remember to look at the site as a whole, not just the home page. Make sure that every page – even the ones that are completely full of graphics and content – are loading as fast as possible.

Some good tools for getting on top of the speed are:

  • Google Insights for Search
  • Google Analytics
  • Quicksprout Site Speed Score

There are some simple things every website can do to start optimizing for speed, which can include caching, minification, image optimization, and optimizing for browser caching.

It actually doesn’t take much to get better speed out of your pages, but many companies let it slide. In the webinar we go over some examples of pages that let things get out of hand and how a couple changes made a huge difference.

The Extra Work is Worth It

One reason many companies fail to track these metrics is simply because there aren’t a lot of automated ways to do it. Most of the things we discuss in the webinar will involve a lot of manual work to derive the necessary stats. While there are some tools that can get you started, it’s still going to take some effort to get in there and put this information together. It can be a little daunting, especially to sites with a lot of pages, but the results will be worth it.

If you would like Mojoe.net to discuss developing your logo, web site, web application, need custom programming, or IT consultant, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-859-9848 or you can email us at dwerne@mojoe.net

Article Provided by SEO

The 10 commandments of blogging

Friday, January 18th, 2013
It’s a new year. You have another year to achieve your business and blogging goals. There are many things you will need to do this year, but there are a few things you must do to get the most out of your blog. Let’s call them commandments.

1. Thou shalt write every day.

Words are your hammer and nails. Know how to use them, and they will build your blog and business. The only way to master writing is to write a lot, so set aside time every day to write a few paragraphs. Over time you’ll find your style and voice.

2. Thou shalt publish once a week.

I’ve neglected this commandment before and suffered. A blog is a living organism, and you must feed it with new content. A blog without fresh content will be ignored by readers and Google, drying up your traffic, leads and sales. Your traffic will increase as you post more frequently.

Be careful to balance frequency with quality. No one will return to a blog with shoddy content.

3. Thou shalt build an email list.

You must identify readers who want a deeper relationship with your content. These readers will become sharers, leads and sales. Even if you don’t plan to sell anything to them, collect their email addresses. Your email list is your first and most important business asset.

4. Thou shalt track everything.

Install Google Analytics on your blog. Get comfortable with the reports and tools. Understand who sends you traffic and which posts attract the most subscribers, leads and sales. Without this data you’ll take unnecessary risks, bet on the wrong content, and overlook valuable opportunities.

Tip: Google Analyticator is a WordPress plugin that makes it very easy to install Google Analytics.

5. Thou shalt sell something.

This is simple. You can’t earn an income from your blog if you have an empty cupboard. If you sell a product, find ways to pre-sell it with helpful posts. If you offer a service or advice, use your blog to explain your approach and demonstrate your techniques. You are not in business until you have a product and customers. Work on your product now.

6. Thou shalt use social media wisely.

I’ve watched many blogs suffer and die because their owners spent more time tweeting than creating content, building lists, and selling products. Social media is the new town square; it’s where you go to have meaningful conversations with like-minded people. But conversations aren’t sales. Use your time wisely.

7. Thou shalt look great.

Your blog has to look great. There are thousands of great-looking professional themes out there that will give your blog an immediate makeover. You can buy most of the best themes for less than $100. Don’t expect your visitors to invest in your blog if you won’t.

8. Thou shalt ask for action.

It’s hard to ask your readers to take action, but you must do it. You won’t get subscribers, comments, retweets or clients until you learn how to ask. The secret to asking for action is to share/give valuable information first.

9. Thou shalt love SEO.

Google will likely be your most reliable long-term traffic source. It will index every post you publish, and potentially lead more readers to your blog. Search engine optimization (SEO) is an evolving collection of tactics to get top rankings in Google’s search results. While SEO can be confusing at first, it can bring you tons of targeted visitors. Make learning SEO a goal and watch it pay dividends in 2013. This post will get you started.

10. Thou shalt remember your blog is only a marketing tool.

Some believe that social media and blogging are magical. Sprinkle a little blogging dust and you don’t have to build a great product, market it, or hustle for customers. That’s not true.

Your blog is a powerful tool, but just a tool. Learn how to use it to achieve your overall business goals.

Stanford Smith is the managing director at Pushing Social, where a version of this article originally appeared.

(Image via)
Want more information on WordPress Tips and Plugins?
Top 10 Essential WordPress Security Plugins

WordPress Tips and Plugins

Wednesday, April 25th, 2012

Alright WordPress User’s

Here are the top 5 WordPress Plugins that we recommend:

Each one of these plugins can be of great benefit to your blog or WordPress web site.

Google Analytics for WordPress
We have found that the Google Analytics for WordPress plugin integrates easily with most versions of WordPress. Simple to setup as well, all you need to do is register your site with Google Analytics and you will be issued a UA-XXXXXXX-X number you then type this number into the plugin and authorize it and your done. You now have custom statistical information about your web site. It can take several days for the information to become available at your Gooogle Analytics account.

Goolge XML Sitemaps
Another plugin that works effectively and is easy to install in most WordPress versions; this will not only create your XML sitemap, but it will also submit your XML site map to Bing, Ask, and Google. In addition it will also create your robots.txt file. This is a great method for updating the search engines about your web site or blog and the changes that you make.

JetPack by WordPress
This plugin is kind of what you would call in All-In-One Plugin. It does quite a few different things but it is built all into one plugin which makes management of those features quite easy to control. It allows social connections with Facebook, Twitter, and so on with all of your post or pages. Jetpack also has stats all it own, you can configure a backup of your web site. You can use different widgets in-conjunction with the plugin so you can post your twitter stream, or have people to subscrive

WordPress Backup to Dropbox
We would not install or use a WordPress web site or blog for a customer without having this plugin installed. It makes a full and complete copy of your site and all of its files. You can schedule the backup for the day of the week and the time and how often the backup occurs. It also stores a copy of your entire database as well. This is a must have utility for anyone wanting to use WordPress.

WordPress SEO
This is an self contained search engine optimization and registration plugin that allows you to tie in titles, meta-descriptions, meta-keywords, as well as submit your XML sitemap, and will assist you with techniques for optimizing your blog post. NOTE: Please be careful when using these plugin in conjunction with each plugin above. Some of the plugins do the exact same task and other ones only do a portion.

If you would like further information or would like to discuss  your web site or web application. You can schedule a Free consultation with Mojoe.net. Please do not hesitate to call us at 864-859-9848 or you can visit our home page and fill out the form. Next Week we will discuss some WordPress Tips.

Web Design Greenville SC | Mojoe Blog is proudly powered by WordPress | Entries (RSS) and Comments (RSS).

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