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Posts Tagged ‘Social Media’

Social Media Marketing – What Is It?

Friday, August 5th, 2016

social media marketing

What Is Social Media Marketing?

Social media marketing refers to the process of gaining traffic or attention through social media sites.

Social media itself is a catch-all term for sites that may provide radically different social actions. For instance, Twitter is a social site designed to let people share short messages or “updates” with others. Facebook, in contrast is a full-blown social networking site that allows for sharing updates, photos, joining events and a variety of other activities.

How Are Search & Social Media Marketing Related?

Why would a search marketer — or a site about search engines — care about social media? The two are very closely related.

Social media often feeds into the discovery of new content such as news stories, and “discovery” is a search activity. Social media can also help build links that in turn support into SEO efforts. Many people also perform searches at social media sites to find social media content. Social connections may also impact the relevancy of some search results, either within a social media network or at a ‘mainstream’ search engine.

Article Provided By: Search Engine Land

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8 Essential Elements of a Social Media Marketing Strategy

Friday, April 8th, 2016

Social Media Marketing Strategy

Do you need help getting started with your social media marketing strategy?

Do you know what to include?

Goals and objectives guide your social media strategy to help you successfully connect with your customers.

In this article I’ll share what you need to include in your social media marketing strategy so it works from day one.

#1: Identify Business Goals

Every piece of your social media strategy serves the goals you set. You simply can’t move forward without knowing what you’re working toward.

Look closely at your company’s overall needs and decide how you want to use social media to contribute to reaching them.

You’ll undoubtedly come up with several personalized goals, but there are a few that all companies should include in their strategy—increasing brand awareness, retaining customers and reducing marketing costs are relevant to everyone.

Social Media Marketing Strategy

First, set your goals and objectives. Image: Shutterstock.

I suggest you choose two primary goals and two secondary goals to focus on. Having too many goals distracts you and you’ll end up achieving none.

#2: Set Marketing Objectives

Goals aren’t terribly useful if you don’t have specific parameters that define when each is achieved. For example, if one of your primary goals is generating leads and sales, how many leads and sales do you have to generate before you consider that goal a success?

Marketing objectives define how you get from Point A (an unfulfilled goal) to Point B (a successfully fulfilled goal). You can determine your objectives with the S-M-A-R-T approach: Make your objectives specific, measurable, achievable, relevant and time-bound.

Social Media Marketing Strategy

Measurement is important to your strategy. Image: Shutterstock.

Using our previous example, if your goal is to generate leads and sales, a specific marketing objective may be to increase leads by 50%. In order to measure your progress,choose which analytics and tracking tools you need to have in place.

Setting yourself up for failure is never a good idea. If you set an objective of increasing sales by 1,000%, it’s doubtful you’ll meet it. Choose objectives you can achieve, given the resources you have.

You’ve taken the time to refine your goals so they’re relevant to your company, so extend that same consideration to your objectives. If you want to get support from your C-level executives, ensure your objectives are relevant to the company’s overall vision.

Attaching a timeframe to your efforts is imperative. When do you intend to achieve your goal(s)? Next month? By the end of this year?

Your objective of increasing leads by 50% may be specific, measurable, achievable and relevant, but if you don’t set a deadline for achieving the goal, your efforts, resources and attention may be pulled in other directions.

#3: Identify Ideal Customers

If a business is suffering from low engagement on their social profiles, it’s usually because they don’t have an accurate ideal customer profile.

Buyer personas help you define and target the right people, in the right places, at the right times with the right messages.

When you know your target audience’s age, occupation, income, interests, pains, problems, obstacles, habits, likes, dislikes, motivations and objections, then it’s easier and cheaper to target them on social or any other media.

buyer persona graphic

A buyer persona is a fictional character, not a real one!

The more specific you are, the more conversions you’re going to get out of every channel you use to promote your business.

#4: Research Competition

When it comes to social media marketing, researching your competition not only keeps you apprised of their activity, it gives you an idea of what’s working so you can integrate those successful tactics into your own efforts.

Start by compiling a list of at least 3-5 main competitors. Search which social networks they’re using and analyze their content strategy. Look at their number of fans or followers, posting frequency and time of day.

Also pay attention to the type of content they’re posting and its context (humorous, promotional, etc.) and how they’re responding to their fans.

The most important activity to look at is engagement. Even though page admins are the only ones who can calculate engagement rate on a particular update, you can get a good idea of what they’re seeing.

For example, let’s say you’re looking at a competitor’s last 20-30 Facebook updates. Take the total number of engagement activities for those posts and divide it by the page’s total number of fans. (Engagement activity includes likes, comments, shares, etc.)

You can use that formula on all of your competitors’ social profiles (e.g., on Twitter you can calculate retweets and favorites).

Keep in mind that the calculation is meant to give you a general picture of how the competition is doing so you can compare how you stack up against each other. (more…)

Who’s Really Using Social Media in 2015

Friday, August 14th, 2015

Social’s biggest network isn’t dying, but it is getting grayer

How will the social media landscape change over the next two years as social sharing and communication technologies continue to evolve? Exclusive data from eMarketer show which networks will continue to gain momentum, while others necessarily lose ground. But in spite of talk about Facebook killers, that behemoth and its top competitors are not going anywhere.

“Let’s face it: As much as we complain about those over-sharers who inundate us with baby photos and vacation snapshots, we’re still in love with social networking,” said Debra Aho Williamson, eMarketer’s principal analyst. “More than half the U.S. population uses social networks regularly, and Facebook continues to lead the market. But pay attention to mobile social networking, where Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest and Tumblr are all significant players. That’s where the next phase of growth is happening.”

Here’s a breakdown of how eMarketer predicts market share will change for different U.S. demographics for the top social nets over 2015 and 2016.

[Update: The number of total social network users in 2015 below should be 179.7 million including users under the age of 18. All other total figures include this demographic.]

Infographic: Social Media network users

Infographic: Carlos Monteiro

Article Provided by: ADWEEK

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lucspeisser

 

 

 

 

Social Media Security

Friday, July 31st, 2015

 

 Social Media Security, is your company up for the challenge?

Social Media Security - Restricted Info

 

New and recent entrants to the global workforce are posing increasing security challenges to their employers as they mix personal and private lives.

Nowhere is this more evident than in the use of social media, often accompanied by a low regard or even total disregard for privacy concerns.

Some 91% of Generation Y students and workers believe the age of privacy is over, while a third are unconcerned about the data that is captured about them, according to the latest Cisco Connected World Technology Report.
“More Generation Y workers globally said they feel more comfortable sharing personal information with retail sites than with their own employers’ IT departments,” says Cisco.

This attitude is at odds with business concerns about the disclosure of commercially sensitive information through social media to potentially hundreds of millions of Twitter and Facebook users.

In Europe, concerns about privacy linked to security are particularly acute, as evidenced by proposals for a new cyber security directive that link privacy and security.

The proposals aim to impose EU-wide reporting requirements on companies that run large databases, including social networking firms.

Although the final wording of the directive remains to be seen, the proposals are a good indication of just how seriously European authorities view data breaches.

Threats associated with social networking

But not only is social networking a threat to a company’s security because of what employees might disclose, but also because social networking sites are a prime target for cyber criminals.

According to the Cisco 2013 Annual Security Report, the highest concentration of online security threats are on mass audience sites, including social media. The report revealed that online advertisements are 182 times more likely to deliver malicious content than pornography sites, for example.

The ability of individuals to share information with an audience of millions is at the heart of the particular challenge that social media presents to businesses. In addition to giving anyone the power to disseminate commercially sensitive information, social media also gives the same power to spread false information, which can be just as damaging.

The rapid spread of false information through social media is among the emerging risks identified by the World Economic Forum in its Global Risks 2013 report.

The report’s authors draw the analogy of shouting “Fire” in a crowded cinema. Within minutes, people can be trampled to death before a correction can be made to the message.

 Social Media Security - Blog graphicThere have been several incidents over the past year where false information transmitted on the internet has had serious consequences, according to the report.

For example, a fake tweet by a someone impersonating the Russian interior minister, claiming that the Syrian president had been killed or injured, caused crude prices to rise by over $1 before traders realised the news was false.

Harnessing the power of social media

The unprecedented reach of social media is something companies cannot afford to ignore because of the positive and negative effect it can have on the business.

Its power must therefore be recognised and managed. In the UK, BT is one firm that has done just this. Its customer service team runs a sophisticated social media operation across the most popular services.

The strategy is helping BT improve its reputation for customer service, and producing a clear return on investment for the business, according to Warren Buckley, managing director for customer services at the telco.

BT has created its own software to trawl social media services for references to the company, he told CIOs and IT leaders at a meeting of Computer Weekly’s 500 Club in 2012.

The results enable BT to respond quickly to complaints and queries, and the technology is paying for itself by helping BT retain customers, who could otherwise defect to rivals, said Buckley.

BT is also harnessing the power of social media in other ways. During the London riots, for example, BT turned to social media to help ease the strain on the 999 emergency line.

“We tweeted, ‘Only call 999 in an emergency’, and within 15 minutes we were back to answering calls within three seconds and the number of calls dropped off,” said Buckley.

Like BT, investment bank Investec has technology in place to measure sentiment on the internet by picking up any mentions of the bank in social media, mainly for marketing purposes.

However, it forms part of the bank’s strategy to reduce the risk of social media becoming an insider threat to information security.

The other technology piece is a granular firewall to limit social media activities based on the user’s role in the organisation.

Manage social media with policies and technology

The most important part of Investec’s social media security strategy is awareness of its policies designed to ensure regulatory compliance and to prevent commercially sensitive information leaking.

The bank’s social media policy comprises just 10 bullet points that make it clear to staff what their obligations are every time they publish something online.

“There is no way organisations can hold back the flow of social media, so it is better to put policies and technologies in place to manage it,” says David Cripps, information security officer at Investec.

 Social Media Security - Blog Graphic 2“Organisations need to understand social media; they need to accept that it is not going away, and if they allow it, they need to monitor for any immoral, illegal, offensive content, and be able to stop it immediately if it occurs,” he told attendees of the Gartner Security & Risk Management Summit 2012 in London.

Companies that recognise the value and threat of social media have demonstrated that success is achieved through empowering staff to undertake social media and social media security on behalf of the organisation in line with a comprehensive policy backed up with continual training.

However, companies should also recognise that analysis of the information in social conversations can produce security intelligence to improve security processes and enhance performance, according to Gartner analyst Andrew Walls.

“Analysis of public conversations can identify imminent, credible threats of physical or logical attack,” he wrote in a 2012 Gartner paper entitled Security Tools for Control of Social Media.

Wall also cautioned against attempts to block access to external social media because they have proved to be ineffective at controlling risks and impede the development of enterprise social media initiatives.

“Unfortunately, organisations that block access to social media rarely analyse social content for security intelligence and remain ignorant as to the risk and potential of social media,” he said.

Article Provided By: ComputerWeekly.com

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iStock_000014069719MediumHave a Brilliant Idea? How to Keep Your Intellectual Property Safe. (Infographic)

Branding, the future of logos, Why brands must reinvent themselves

Monday, June 22nd, 2015
Branding, the future of logos. - Luc Speisser

Luc Speisser is managing director, Paris and Geneva at global brand consulting firm Landor

Branding

The brand is in its golden age. Once an abstract concept used by marketing managers, it has become a board-level concern and a major consideration during business valuations.

But the way brands are developed has changed profoundly. In the ’50s, Walter Landor pioneered classic branding techniques designed to convey friendliness, reliability, and trustworthiness and these techniques lasted for decades. A brand’s logo was its lynchpin, and advertising, websites and business cards were designed around it. A brand had to be, above all, simple and unchanging; with deviation seen as a threat.

But times have changed. Modern markets are hypercompetitive and global and a brand’s customers, competitors, and business models are constantly in flux. This is exacerbated by low barriers to market entry which mean new brands can transform their industry in a matter of months. Zipcar, Uber and booking.com did just this in the car rental, taxi and hotel sectors.

Agile brands have a few key characteristics: they are adaptable and seek out opportunity, they are clear about their principles and able to collaborate with their market, they are multi-platform and active rather than reactive, and, finally, they are outward looking and aware of global influences.

The successful modern brand must break from the traditional model. Maintaining brand ahead of flexibility can make it irrelevant. Similarly, logo and abstract ideas are less important than delivery of brand promise. In short, brands must be rugged and resilient to cope with markets that can be wildly unpredictable.

One such brand is that of French charity, Djantoli, with whom Landor created a concept that has reinvented NGO identities. Djantoli operates throughout Africa where it monitors child weight to detect illnesses such as malaria and diarrhea before they claim lives. Djantoli regularly sends an agent to weigh registered children, then sends the data to a health centre where anomalies prompt a doctor to schedule a check-up.

The new brand updates as the organisation’s success increases; it shows the number of children’s lives saved by the project in real time. As the number grows, friends and partners are alerted, motivating them to contribute more and help save lives. Digital platforms are refreshed via a link between the doctor’s notes and a brand-management system; and business cards are updated by a stamp with the new number.

Djantoli’s success is demonstrated by the brand itself, disrupting perceptions of normally static logos and acting as a permanent and free communications campaign. The positivity of the brand is also a contrast to the often negative way NGOs convey their message.

Nine months after the new brand was implemented, the number of registered children increased by 62%, donations from individuals increased by 100% and, most importantly, the number of lives saved doubled. With zero media investment, Djantoli’s success relies on a single, yet powerful change: its identity. Not bad for a logo, is it?

(more…)

How to Build a Social Media Strategy That Works

Tuesday, June 16th, 2015

Social Media

 

Social Media Strategies

Social media is one of the most powerful tools in your marketing arsenal. If you use it correctly, you can create a strong personal connection with your prospective customers. However, marketers often make the mistake of diving into social media without a clear plan. At best, this is a waste of time – and at worst, it can lead to a PR disaster. To benefit from social media, you need to build a clear strategy that takes into account what you’re trying to achieve, who your customers are and what your competition is doing.

Here are a few tips to help get you started:

Understand your goals
As with any journey, the first step in creating a social-media marketing strategy is to understand where you want to go. What is the purpose of your social media marketing efforts? Do you want to create or raise awareness of your brand? Are you looking to increase sales, or website traffic, or both? Is your goal to build customer loyalty and increase retention? These goals aren’t mutually exclusive, but you should focus on one or two: If you spread yourself too thin, you’re not going to accomplish anything.

Create measurable objectives
It’s time to set clear objectives based on your goals. Focus on the S.M.A.R.T. strategy for goal setting to ensure your objectives are specific, measurable, attainable, relevant and time based.

For example, if you’re a B2B marketer looking to increase sales, you might decide that you want to generate an additional 100 online leads a month. On the other hand, if your goal is brand awareness, then you might want to increase the number of times your brand is mentioned on social media by 50 percent. In all cases, these objectives should be directly tied to your business goals, and they should be achievable. Otherwise, they’re just wishful thinking. Also, make sure your objectives are time limited. For instance, you need to achieve that 50 percent growth in brand awareness within six months, not at some undefined time in the future.

Once you set your objectives, make sure you can measure them. Find the right tools to track and analyze each one, so that you can quantify your progress. Not only will this let you know when you have arrived, it will also help you to spot problems early and adjust your course if you need to.

Characterize your customers
Now you know where you’re going, but you still don’t know how to get there. A successful social-media strategy is all about targeting the right people with the right messages. To do this, you need to understand your audience. For instance, there’s no point in targeting everyone in the 18 to 35 age group if you really want to get to upwardly mobile young professionals who are technology enthusiasts.

The best way to do this is to create buyer personas. Sit down and create a detailed profile of your ideal customer. Start by giving them a name. How old are they? What is their income? Do they have children? What do they like or dislike? What motivates them? And so on. If you have more than one ideal customer, create a persona for each.

Look at the competition
When it comes to social media, your competition can tell you a lot about what works and what doesn’t. After all, they’re targeting the same customers you are. If you ignore your competition, you’re giving up a fantastic opportunity to learn from their successes and mistakes.
To research your competitors, start by picking three or four of the top ones. Find out which social networks they’re active on, and study their content. Is it funny or serious? What kind of cultural references do they use? Do they talk about their product primarily, or do they focus on other things?

For example, if you sell snowboards, do your competitors talk about how their snowboards perform, or do they post amazing snowboarding videos that just happen to include their products? Then, see how well each competitor is doing (e.g. how much engagement — comments, shares, likes) — they get on their Facebook updates.) This will let you determine which strategies work and which ones don’t.

Develop your messages
Now you have a handle on your ideal customers and your competition, it’s time to start building your messages. This isn’t detailed content; rather it’s the top level set of key messages that you think will resonate with your customers based on the personas you have created. Choose two or three messages, then break each one down another level creating a simple messaging hierarchy.

There’s nothing wrong with adopting some of your competitors’ successful messaging ideas but also try to create original messages that set you apart — this will help you to create a unique brand voice. Don’t be afraid to get creative as your social media presence should be exciting, not boring.

Choose your channels
Not all social-media platforms are the same. You need to choose the right ones for the products or services you’re selling.

For example, LinkedIn is a good platform to target for business-to-business sales while Pinterest may be better if you’re in the fashion business. Some of these channels will become obvious when you look at your competitors but see if any relevant channels were overlooked.

You should also identify influencers who can reach your target audience. Good bloggers command high levels of trust in their readers and are indispensable in creating buzz around your brand. Take the time to target the most appropriate bloggers – sites such as mine, Tomoson, can help you to do this.

Build a content plan
Finally, you need to develop a strong content plan that will deliver engaging material. The content needs to align with your overall messaging and be appropriate for the channels you’re using. This is more than just product information – think about how you can deliver real value to your audience. Don’t just stick to one type of media – a mix of videos, guides, infographics and other styles will engage your potential customers more effectively. Also, don’t think of content as something you post once. You need to have an ongoing presence on social media, and that includes delivering fresh content on a regular basis.

Article Provided By Entrepreneur

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How to Use Landing Pages to Turn Attention into Business

Thursday, May 28th, 2015

Landing Pages - Social LogosDo you ever envy those folks with hundreds of thousands of Twitter followers, massive numbers of Facebook “Likes,” or floods of blog traffic you can only dream about?

Well, don’t envy them until you’re absolutely sure they actually have a successful business, not just a hefty Klout score.

Unfortunately, building a massive online presence doesn’t magically translate into business. But the happy flip side is — you don’t need to have a zillion social media fans in order to have a successful business, either.

Today we’re going to talk about how to translate attention (which is fleeting on the web, as we know) into paying customers.

Let’s get it started.

First, let’s look at what a landing page is and what it does for your business.

Landing pages turn attention into action

A landing page is a web page designed to focus the attention of your audience member, get her thinking about the right things, and convincing her to take action.

Some actions might be:

  • To make a purchase
  • To sign up for your email list
  • To register to vote
  • To sign up for a volunteer activity
  • To sign a petition
  • To make a donation

It doesn’t really matter what action you want that audience member to take. The landing page is the right tool to get it done.

That means you minimize distractions, pull out all your copywriting skills, and do everything you can to persuade this person to take the action you desire.

Attention on the web is scattered

We’ve all been there — we’re going to seriously focus on something we find on the web … and when we look up 45 minutes later, somehow we’ve just spent all that time reading chocolate cake recipes on Pinterest.

The web is a highly distracting place, and that’s not good for your audience when it comes time for them to focus on what you have to offer.

That’s why landing pages are primarily an attention focusing device. They take a sort-of-paying-attention prospect and dial up her attention level.

That’s why, incidentally, landing pages typically don’t have sidebars, navigation, or links to anything other than the desired action. Once you have your prospect’s attention focused, the last thing you want to do is send him ping-ponging around the web again.

Landing pages use your best persuasion skills

Anything and everything you know about copywriting will go into your landing pages. As you pick up more skill, your landing pages will only get better.

Some important elements of your landing page include:

  • A compelling headline to draw readers in
  • A thorough discussion of benefits (what your product does for your customer) and features
  • Enticing fascinations that build curiosity and desire for what you’re selling (even if it’s free, like your email autoresponder)
  • A clear call to action that lets people know exactly what to do next
  • Some great testimonials, if you have them, to show your expertise and credibility

Article Provided By CopyBlogger

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Marketing Core: Getting Started with Content Promotion

Friday, May 22nd, 2015

Marketing Core: Getting Started with Content Promotion

Content Promotion

What’s the first task of every marketer? To grab the Attention of our potential customer. Until we have that, we don’t get an opportunity to deliver our marketing message.

So before we get down to it, first things first. We can’t talk about content promotion without pointing out an important fact.

None of this will work for boring content.

There is no shortcut or workaround. Your content has to be remarkable, period, in order to get the sharing and links that will make you successful.

It’s not a matter of being able to write something that could be published in The New Yorker. But you do need to be able to create content worth talking about. Otherwise — well, no one will talk about you.

We’ve talked before about what makes for remarkable content. For most scenarios, look to create a combination of:

  1. A strong, unique, and memorable voice
  2. Content that’s remarkably useful
  3. Content that’s interesting and reader-friendly

Within that so-called formula is room for infinite variation. Make it your own, butmake it remarkable.

Important: You personally may not be the best person to create remarkable content for your site. If not, start beating the bushes for a contract writer. You might even consider entering into a formal business partnership with someone who does have a strong writing voice (and typically an audience to go with it). It’s that important.

Cultivate your network

Once you have something worth talking about, you need to go find some people to talk about it.

The first question to ask is,

Who else has the traffic you want?

Somewhere out there are people who have the attention of the audience you’re looking for. Your task is to figure out what you can create that will put you on their radar.

Sometimes, this is another blogger or content publisher in your topic. But sometimes it can also be a publisher in a related topic. For example, guest blogging expert Jon Morrow talks about an extremely successful guest post he wrote for Penelope Trunk’s Brazen Careerist blog. He was promoting his own blog, On Moneymaking (which he has since sold). Her blog covered a different topic, but she had the readers he wanted.

The post reached the desired audience and delivered a terrific result — the traffic and subscribers Jon was looking for.

Understand why people share content

It’s very important to realize that influential people share content because it increases their influence with their audience.

That dovetails nicely with our description of remarkable content above. Content that has a distinctive voice, that’s useful, and that’s reader-friendly will also make influential people look smart with their audiences when they share it. Everybody wins.

You’ll also want to be sure to put a solid headline on every piece of content that you want to get shared and linked to. (Which typically means, virtually every piece of content you publish.) The right headline can make all the difference between content that soars and content that fizzles.

Nice guys finish first

You know that successful person who’s awful to everyone? Who makes a name for himself being rude, disrespectful, snarky, and just plain mean?

Yeah, he’s not actually successful. He probably gets a lot of social media attention— and he’s also probably broke.

It should go without saying, but when you’re building your network of content publishers, be a nice person! Be polite, be (genuinely) interested in what your network is doing, be friendly.

Your professional network can make or break you as a content marketer. And social media is already too full of name-calling jerks. Be a good egg. It will serve you well.

How about SEO?

Search engine optimization is a key strategy in content promotion. Fortunately, all of the same techniques you use to get social shares and links will also benefit you with search engines. Be remarkable, develop a solid network of influential content publishers, create lots of useful content, use powerful headlines, and you’ll find that 90% of your SEO work is done.

(The remaining 10% can be taken care of with Scribe — Here’s a link for a nice deal if you aren’t already a Scribe owner.)

Article Provided by: Copyblogger

If you would like Mojoe.net to discuss developing your logo, web site, web application, need custom programming, or IT consultant, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-859-9848 or you can email us at dwerne@mojoe.net.

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Social Media Strategies

Wednesday, February 25th, 2015

 

Social Media Strategies

Pamela Lund is a well-known PPC marketing specialist, and an upcoming speaker at the SEJ Summit in Santa Monica on February 24thThe conference ticket cost for attendees is being covered by our partner, Searchmetrics, which delivers enterprise SEO and content marketing analysis, recommendations, forecasting and reporting for companies that want potential customers to find them faster.

Want to attend? We still have a few spots open – so if you are in the LA area and want to learn from Pamela (and other speakers like Neil Patel, Stephan Spencer, Morgan Brown, and more), sign up for an invite now. If you aren’t in the LA area, check out where else the SEJ Summit will be this year, including Chicago, NYC, San Francisco, London, and Dallas.

 

We are excited to welcome Pamela next week. and can’t wait to hear what she has to say. But for now, here is some insight from Pamela on PPC and paid social media:

1. Out of all the platforms you run PPC campaigns for clients (AdWords, FB, LinkedIn, Bing, etc), which do you find to have the largest ROI?

As with all things SEM, the answer is it depends.

For e-commerce, the best performing channels in my experience are AdWords and Bing search, including Shopping/Product Listing Ads campaigns. Buyer intent is higher when people are specifically searching your keywords and you can qualify them with the ad message. Shopping ads work particularly well for sellers who have the best prices in their market or unique products that stand out from the competition when users see product images. You can be successful with AdWords and Bing search based ads with almost any budget (within reason).

AdWords and Bing search based ads also work well for lead generation if you have a landing page optimized for converting this type of traffic. Frequently people are in research mode when searching, so you need to give them just enough information to convince them to contact you or offer them something in exchange, such as a relevant white paper, in exchange for submitting their contact information.

Display/banner advertising can work well for almost any business if proper targeting is employed in combination with good banners and a strong landing page. You may want to expect lower performance from display advertising in exchange for the branding you receive. View through conversions can indicate if display advertising is offering any lift in conversions.

Facebook ads and Twitter ads can be successful for e-commerce if you have a product or service that is inexpensive and interesting enough to be an impulse buy and you’re targeting the right audience. In many cases though, I use social network advertising for branding, for giveaways and contests, and for cheap traffic generation so we can tag users with remarketing pixels so we can reach them with ads when they are in a buying mindset. I also usually encourage clients to run a likes/followers ad campaign so we can increase the number of quality fans both for page engagement and branding as well as to improve the data available for building lookalike audiences for ad targeting.

LinkedIn Ads work well for B2B products and services, but usually when used as lead gen with the actual sale happening through an email drip or personal contact. The LinkedIn Ads platform offers fantastic targeting options if you know the job title of your decision maker or if you are trying to reach people who work in certain industries. Unfortunately, the minimum CPC is $2 so if you do not convert well or have a high CPA threshold, the leads may be too expensive. Volume is also a limiting factor for LinkedIn Ads.

For app installs, Twitter and Facebook ads perform well. If the app is free, the conversion rates can be phenomenal. You need to have some form of app analytics implemented to track the quality of the installs to optimize your targeting for the long-term, but if sheer volume of installs/user signups is the goal, such as with start-ups raising funding, social ads are a good approach.

2. What types of companies should focus more on paid social campaigns via paid search?

Companies trying to boost app installs, grow fan engagement, build remarketing audience size, or building buzz for an upcoming offering will most likely have better results from social advertising than from paid search. Anything with a social component will also work well if you are targeting users in the network you want them to use to share your content. For instance, if you are running a contest that people get an extra entry to if they share your content, they will be more likely to share it if it is as easy as possible. So, targeting people within Facebook with a request to share a Facebook post will be more successful than targeting people with an AdWords ad that links to your website with a request to share the page on a social network.

Companies that have a longer buying cycle or those that get repeat purchases from their users tend to see a significant boost in conversions if they incorporate social network advertising in their overall strategy because they keep the brand in the user’s consciousness. Even if the conversions don’t come from clicks on the social ads, the consistent reminders bring users back for future purchases. Just like television advertising doesn’t cause people to immediately get in the car and drive to the store to buy a product, it influences their buying decision next time they are shopping.

Any business that has a strong social presence can also be successful advertising on social networks. Without a strong social presence (active Facebook page or Twitter stream), the advertising may not be as effective as people tend to look for multiple cues before buying.

3. When I do PPC campaigns for clients, writing “perfect” ad copy can get tedious. Can you give us a few strategies for writing ad copy?

Good PPC managers are a wonderfully crazy bunch. We have to have a bit of a split personality in order to be successful at and enjoy our jobs. That being said, optimizing ad copy can be tedious, especially if you’ve been working on an account for a while and think you’ve tested everything that can be tested. However, there are always new things to try. Some of my favorite tips are:

  • When writing ads for a new client, read their website to get comfortable with any language specific to their business, ask the client to describe their product to you in their own words, read their competitors’ ads and websites, and read forums or product reviews to see how consumers refer to the product. Use phrases that the consumers use, even if your client doesn’t use them. You’re not trying to get your client to click the ad, you’re trying to attract buyers.
  • When writing new ads, don’t try to change every piece of the ad. You only need to change one line, and sometimes only one word, to have a significant impact on performance. If you change too many variables at once, you won’t know what caused the change in CTR or conversion rate and you’ll use up all your good ideas in one ad. Instead, try a new headline or change the context (use an exclamation instead of a question).
  • Don’t try to be too clever with text ads. You have a split second to get people to pay attention and decide to click. Never underestimate the value of just telling people what to do, such as “Buy Now To Save 20%.”
  • The formula of “ask a question and solve the problem” works well in most industries. If you ask the right question to the right audience and have the right solution, you will get a good CTR and conversion rate. If someone is searching for a roofer you might show them an ad that says “Need A New Roof? Mention This Ad For $250 Off.” Needing a new roof is their problem and giving them $250 off a new one is your solution.

4. What made you decide to specialize on PPC instead of trying to focus on multiple areas of marketing?

I love SEM because I get to do something different every day, even if I’m working on the same accounts for extended periods of time. There are so many facets to internet advertising from keyword research to writing ad copy to data analysis to audience identification that it never gets boring. I also love the instant gratification you get with advertising. I can put up a campaign and have data within minutes. Not that I ever obsessively refresh the Google Analytics real-time reports right after launching new campaigns. Nope, I never do that.

And if I’m being honest, I have absolutely no website design ability nor do I have the patience to chase search engine algorithms by doing SEO. My skills just fit perfectly with advertising management.

5. I’m always trying to create a dialogue about women in search marketing since we are usually the minority. What are three tactics you can give to new women search professionals trying to make a name for themselves in the search industry?

This is the hardest question in this interview by far because my first instinct is to say “Don’t think of yourself as a woman in the search industry.” I’ll quote my friend Rae Hoffman who has written on this issue and has somehow done a much better job of conveying how I feel about it than I can:

“Be yourselves, never see being a woman as a disadvantage, an advantage or above all, an excuse.”

That being said, here are a few tips for anyone of any gender in any industry, mostly geared towards freelancers:

  • Network with people who do something other than what you do. You’re more likely to get referrals from people who aren’t your competition than people who are. Yes, I refer work to other SEM agencies and those agencies refer to me but the majority of my referrals come from SEOs, web designers, and happy clients. It’s important to know people who do the same thing you do so you can ask them questions when you have a problem, but if you’re trying to grow your profile, network with other people, too. Yes, that includes people who aren’t even in the search industry.
  • Be trustworthy and be a resource for others. If you develop a reputation for being honest and trustworthy, people will be more likely to recommend you for jobs and will be more interested in what you have to say, leading to more speaking engagements, blogging opportunities, or other exposure.
  • Don’t trash your competition to get ahead. This is a small industry and whatever you say will get back to whomever you say it about. Just don’t be that person. You’re better than that. If you aren’t, become better than that.
  • Charge what you’re worth and stand behind your prices. If you aren’t confident about your rates, your clients won’t be either. If a client doesn’t think you’re worth what you’re charging, rather than reducing your rates to keep them, let them go so you will have time to work on a project that pays you what you’re worth. Now, if none of your clients think you’re worth what you’re charging, you may need to look at the value you’re providing.
  • Don’t work with clients you don’t like or for businesses you morally disagree with.You will perform much better for clients you enjoy working for and will do a much better job of selling products you believe in.

If you would like Mojoe.net to discuss developing your logo, web site, web application, need custom programming, or IT consultant, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-859-9848 or you can email us at dwerne@mojoe.net.

Article Provided By Search Engine Journal

Digital Footprint – Cracking the Code

Friday, February 21st, 2014

Cracking the Code: Web Design and how it affects Your Firm’s Digital Footprint

Digital Footprint, Mojoe.net

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tips and Practices for understanding your digital footprint

The creation and marketing of a Web Site for a Law Firm’s is a unique type of undertaking. Law firms unfortunately are restricted as I am sure most of you are well aware of when it comes to advertising, endorsements and discussing cases. This does not make marketing a law firm services and identity an easy task.

And now you have to contend with your firm’s digital footprint and brand identity that has been released out into cyberspace, people are constantly dreaming up new ways to hijack your brand and siphon off its value. From phishing attacks to counterfeit domains and bogus Facebook accounts, each new digital channel quickly attracts its share of “black hat” operators. In conjunction your firm has to combat anonymous complaints because of your firm’s web site and its content.

(Note: This situation will get more complicated in the coming years due to the gTLD program which will create 1800 new domain name extensions.)

So how do you establish your firm’s digital footprint while still adhering to the rules?

The expansion of social interaction, email, web sites, smart phones, tablets, and e-blast have driven down cost, but in-turn created a global audience and have given multiple ways to reach clients.

So how do you as marketing professionals measure and develop a digital reputation for your law firm that shares excellent resources and presents a compelling narrative for learning more so a client or potential client can make an informed decision about who your law firm is and what services your law firm offers.

Which you hope will prompt them to perform a call to action, that creates business for your firm. That is quantifiable.

So, what is your firm’s digital footprint and what is the message your firm’s digital footprint is conveying?

How big is your brand’s digital footprint? Likely bigger than you think Geographic or country domains, email addresses, Twitter handles, Facebook pages, LinkedIn pages, mobile apps, blogs—many brands have all of these and more.

Here are some basic tools you can use to get a better understanding of your firm’s digital footprint.

So now you have an understanding of your digital footprint.

  • You may have a footprint
  • You may have a partial footprint
  • Your footprint may belong to someone else
  • Your footprint maybe small
  • Your potential footprint maybe extremely large

Depending upon whether your firm’s digital footprint is easy to find, difficult to find or there was nothing to find, gets back to how you market your firm’s web site and its digital presence.

Social Media is one of the most effective ways to manage and promote your digital footprint as well as increase business. Using the following tools can make your firm’s digital footprint easier to manage and maintain. You can also manage your firm’s overall message while making sure to stay within the rules and keep your disclaimer easily accessible.

Search Engine Optimization and Registration the ongoing battle

One of the most overlooked or under-utilized tools for sharing a part of your firm’s digital footprint is search engine optimization and search engine registration. Good and effective SEO is not done only once but is a constant ongoing battle. You have to wage a word WAR in order to accomplish effective SEO placement.

Here is a list of correct common practices that all web site should do for effective optimization

  • Content Creation with Keyword Strategy
  • Google Keyword Planner Tool
  • Deep Linking
  • Alt Tags
  • Title Tags
  • H1 Tags
  • Meta Tags
  • Sitemap.xml
  • Robots.txt file
  • Blogs
  • SEO Plugins and Modules
  • Wikipedia Page

Once you have completed optimization of your site; you need to be sure to register your site every 30 to 90 days with all 30,000 search engines and link directories.

Be sure to continue the battle for your digital footprint (Initial Keyword Strategy)

  • Blog Post
  • Social Post
  • New Page Creation
  • All Digital Content

Analytics and what it means to your firms marketing efforts

Now you have all of this incoming traffic from multiple sources all being directed back to your firm’s web site. You NOW have all of this great analytical data, but what does it mean to you and how can you show the benefit to the rest of the firm.

(Slide 15 Analytics Logos)
Make sure that you have some type of tracking software installed into your site. We prefer Google Analytics because it is free and it offers so much analytical information. There are other analytical engines out there.  Suggested analytics tracking programs that can be installed on your web site.

Looking at Statistics can make your head swim and it is easy to get confused when looking at Google Analytics. There is so much analytical data to sort through that it can seem overwhelming.

Understanding and discerning the statistical information in Google Analytics can be simplified, by breaking it down into the 5 main categories:

  • Real-Time
  • Audience
  • Acquisition
  • Behavior
  • Conversion

Real time, tracks actual visitors on your site, live in real time. You can break that information down into locations, traffic sources, content, events, and conversions.

The audience section will break down the demographics, interest, geo, behavior, technology, mobile, custom and visitors flow. The last two categories have been newly added in the last 6 months. Each one of these sub categories can be broken down even further. The main statistical sections you want to look at are the Overview and Mobile.

  • Overview*
  • Demographics
  • Interests
  • Geo*
  • Behavior*
  • Technology
  • Mobile*
  • Custom
  • Visitors Flow

This section will tell you where your traffic is coming from, whether it is organic, direct, ad words, social, ad word campaigns, or paid search. It is broken into the following sub sections:

  • Overview
  • Channels
  • All Traffic*
  • All Referrals*
  • Campaigns
  • Keywords
  • Cost Analysis
  • Ad Words
  • Social
  • Search Engine Optimization

Behavior is another main section that has a great amount of statistical data, however there are only a couple of sub sections, which are important in helping you determining your traffics behavior. Understanding which pages are attracting traffic to your site and what pages your traffic is leaving your web site. This is critical to the continued health of your firm’s web site.

Overview
Behavior Flow
Site Content*
Site Speed
Site Search
Events
AdSense
Experiments
In-Page Analytics*

Conversions are combined user interaction information with Google Ad words. This section can be extremely important if you are running a Google Ad word campaign and spending ad dollars with Google. This metric will show you conversions from your ad word campaign to a quantifiable action on your web site.

Bringing this all together… Getting a clear view of your digital footprint and taking the necessary steps to optimize your site along with analysis can seem daunting, not least of all because the digital landscape is changing so quickly. However, with the right partner you can ensure that you are prioritizing the actions best suited for your law firm’s digital footprint.

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