Web Site Design & Hosting, Greenville, South Carolina - Mojoe Logo
Web Site Design & Hosting, Greenville, South Carolina - Mojoe Logo

Why Surf the Net when you can Mojoe?

Web Site Design & Hosting, Greenville, South Carolina - Mojoe Logo Blog
Mojoe.net Weblog on Web Site, Web Design, Web Development, and General Info

Posts Tagged ‘Web Design’

50 Features for Small-Business Websites (Infographic)

Friday, April 22nd, 2016

Small-Business Websites

Websites are a necessity for businesses of all sizes today — though, surprisingly almost half of small-business es don’t have websites. Still, there are so many design options to choose from and so many websites that it can be tough to know how to stand out.

Beyond layout and color scheme, there are a lot of features that are paramount to successful small-business websites. Some are obvious — such as an easy-to-remember domain name, a logo and contact information — and others are more subtle, like an online chat button or specific pattern for the content on the site’s inner pages. Thankfully, website design and marketing firm 99MediaLab offers pointers for an effective page from top to bottom, inside and out.

Check out the infographic below to learn the best features to have, as well as SEO tips and the technical aspects to consider. See if your site measures up.

Small-Business Websites

Article Provided By: Entrepreneur

Mojoe iconIf you would like Mojoe.net to discuss your websites analytics, custom logo designs, website, web application, need custom programming, or IT consultant, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-859-9848 or you can email us at dwerne@mojoe.net.

Parallax Scrolling – Web Design Trends To Watch Out For

Friday, March 18th, 2016

Parallax Scrolling

In recent years we’ve seen more sites appear that make use of parallax scrolling.

The parallax technique allows the foreground and background content to scroll at different speeds, creating an illusion of depth. It can be used to very good effect, but it’s debatable if it can be described as having good UX.

Parallax has a few potential issues:

  • Bad for SEO. As sites that utilize parallax scrolling tend to be made up of one page, there’s usually little in the way of content that can be crawled by the search engines. This is especially true as text tends to be embedded in graphics.
  • Can reduce performance. Due to the heavy use of graphics and JavaScript, a page can get clogged up on load. And it’s certainly a headache for mobile users. Load times on mobile tends to be very poor when parallax is used, due to the heavy use of JavaScript.
  • Can affect users negatively. The Journal of Usability Studies carried out research on parallax which found that whilst the parallax site was considered to be more fun than non-parallax sites, some users experienced “motion sickness and experienced significant usability issues when interacting with the parallax website.”

However, parallax scrolling can add another dimension to a site and allow it to stand out. But as we listed, there are trade-offs if you want to create a site that works on both desktop and mobile, then parallax really isn’t for you.

Parallax Scrolling

Photo source: The McWhopper Proposal

 

 

And it is, even if it’s a little cartoon-like, it’s quite well done and tells a story as you move down the page. This is the strength of parallax scrolling; it allows you to effectively tell a story using mostly graphical elements. The page above has imagery, text and video embedded into it, so we put it into GT Metrix to see how it stood up to scrutiny when it came to speed.

 

Parallax Scrolling

 

 

As you can see, the page has a score of A from PageSpeed and C from YSlow. That’s not terrible, but take a look at the page load time … it’s 18.2 seconds, which is hugely slower than most commercial sites that you’ll come across (according the GT Metrix, the average is 6.6s).

According to GTMetrix, the site should also – amongst other things – avoid character sets in the meta tag,

“The following resources have a character set specified in a meta tag. Specifying a character set in a meta tag disables the lookahead downloader in IE8. To improve resource download parallelization, move the character set to the HTTP Content-Type response header.”

Other tips include:

  • Defer parsing of JavaScript as in this instance, 313.6kb of JavaScript is parsed during the initial loading of the page and deferring this can help to reduce “blocking of page rendering.
  • YSlow recommends that the site should minify CSS and JavaScript where possible.
  • The site should use a CDN

So if you’re considering creating a parallax site, ask yourself if the story you want to tell is worth losing visitors due to a reduction in performance. Parallax has to be done well and it has to be a little different in order to capture and hold the attention of the user.

Article Provided By: AWWWARDS

If you would like Mojoe.net to discuss your websites analytics, custom logo designs, website, web application, need custom programming, or IT consultant, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-859-9848 or you can email us at dwerne@mojoe.net.

6 Common Misconceptions

Thursday, March 5th, 2015

 

6 Common Misconceptions - Silhouette

6 Common Misconceptions CEOs Have About Web Development

Remember your last web development project? You went over budget, blew past deadlines and became frustrated with just about everyone involved at some point.

The bad news? It was rough.

The really bad news? It was probably your team’s fault.

Most CEOs have serious misconceptions about web development. This is a problem because businesses are more reliant than ever on their online presence. CEOs in companies of all sizes struggle with this. Here are six myths that most CEOs struggle with:

1. Website development is easy.

Clients commonly request a “simple” 20-page website with a log-in setup, online payment, a blog and other widgets.

Websites such as Facebook and Craigslist may appear simple, but the necessary development work is time-consuming and complicated. The strange thing is that the simpler the design, often the more expensive the site is. Some requests that seem small could involve complicated development work and require days of programming.

2. Everyone should be involved.

Rather than packing all the staff into a conference room to rattle off ideas involve only the people who’ll be doing the work.

Compile your content strategy, brand assets, business objectives and user flows. Don’t spend time mulling deep technical planning, database architecture, layouts, designs or widgets.

3. Websites are a commodity.

With the advent of templates, sites like 99designs and offshore development, many businesspeople harbor the misperception that web design is a cheap commodity.

Taking advantage of already created templates might work for some companies, but for those serious about their brand and online presence, such alternatives won’t suffice long-term.

Consider your website an investment and dedicate appropriate resources toward it. Find a team of designers who understands your business, ask the right questions and have happy customers. A good team will help you manage your goals along with your budget and find optimal solutions. It may seem expensive, but the return on investment will be worth it.

4. Once a site is built, it’s done.

Web development isn’t a once-and-done activity. Once your site is launched, it will need to be maintained. Many midmarket companies have round-the-clock teams monitoring their sites to ensure they remain without glitches.

Even if your website doesn’t handle a high volume of traffic, you still need someone keeping an eye on functionality. You’ll also need security updates and fresh content for SEO purposes.

5. Anyone can create a great user experience.

You can’t build the website yourself. Focus on leading your business and improving your products. Your intern, cousin or IT guy can’t build it either. A lot more that goes into a site than basic knowledge of web design, especially when building payment systems and ensuring integration with the company’s internal systems.

There are free website-building tools that can be great for bootstrapped startup or running a small business site. But they aren’t robust enough for the needs of most established businesses.

For your website, you may need a team to design mostly from scratch, which requires a specific skill set. Let the web design firm hired do what it does best, but make sure its staffers are asking the right questions about the target audiences before they start.

6. It’s your website, so you dictate the design.

It’s natural to want to micromanage your company’s website. Unfortunately, unless you’re a web designer, this isn’t the job for you. You need to trust your web designer if you want site visitors to become paying customers.

Web designers will understand your vision, but you need to let them design. They’re knowledgeable about structure and what helps visitors convert into customers.

If you would like Mojoe.net to discuss developing your logo, web site, web application, need custom programming, or IT consultant, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-859-9848 or you can email us at dwerne@mojoe.net.

Article Provided By Entrepreneur

The psychology of Web design

Friday, January 23rd, 2015

The psychology of Web design: How colors, typefaces and spacing affect your mood

Psychology of Web Design Color Splash

A great website design is so much more than just delivering content and making it look good. When visitors come to your site, they produce a set of feelings about your website and your organization. The type of feelings they produce – positive or negative – are entirely in your hands and should not be overlooked when designing content.

Over the years, there has been a body of knowledge produced to help designers create effective visuals that play into the psychology of their viewers. In order to achieve this, one must understand how different design elements and how we use them affect the mood, attitude and experience the visitor will have while browsing our website.

Below are four major areas of website design and development that have the biggest impacts on the psychology of website visitors. These are the tools you’ll need to create a visually-engaging site that encourages visitors to return.

Content

For websites, content drives the design you see on screen. Visitors come to a website to access information they need. Design helps them find the information they need quickly and with ease.

In the early days of the Web, it was common to see pages and pages slammed with content, often pages with 10,000 words or more (as a comparison, this article is about 1,600 words). With pages loaded down with content, it made it extremely difficult to find content, let alone read through to get the information needed. This often invoked stress, anxiety and overall unpleasant feelings for visitors.

With today’s Web, content should be edited and organized so that there is a happy medium between providing adequate and needed information while not overwhelming visitors. When content is in that happy place, visitors are able to find the information quickly and they feel good afterwards.

Hiding content, presenting too much content or otherwise mudding up your website makes visitors irritable, leading to possible loss in potential business.

In addition, the type of content you present sets a tone for you and your organization. If your content doesn’t present the right information in a logical place, is hard to follow or tends to beat around the bush on important information, then visitors will feel this way about you.

work desk computer laptop 730x483 The psychology of Web design: How colors, typefaces and spacing affect your mood

Keep your content clean, organized, easy to read, concise, and professional to help aid in the psychology of your visitors and produce positive vibes.

To help you craft the best content for your website, this article at Tuts+ goes into further detail on the psychology of great content for your website.

Space

The way a Web page is organized can dramatically affect how a visitor feels while they are there. Organizing content should be a priority in any website design, but this organization should take into consideration the space it takes up on the site.

If you’re not familiar, “white space” is the areas of a design in which no content or visual element demanding our attention is present. White space plays an important role in any type of design work, especially Web design, because it visually gives a resting place for the visitor. These resting places are often found in margins and the space around things.

whitespace design web 730x327 The psychology of Web design: How colors, typefaces and spacing affect your mood

The concept of minimalism – that is, using the least amount of visual content needed to convey your point or idea – is currently very popular across the Web

Said differently, if a visitor comes to your website and every inch of real estate on the screen is taken up by words, graphics, blinking things, etc., it starts to feel chaotic and makes them uneasy. If no white space is present, there is nothing for them to move their eyes to take a visual break.

If you take the time to edit and organize your content in a way that is respectful of the space you have to present the information, you give a feeling of professionalism, organization and overall good vibes to visitors. You want your visitors to feel like you have your stuff together and that you are easy to work with.

Keeping things simple with a well organized website using adequate white space tells visitors you know what’s important and you don’t want to waste their time.

Learn more about white space and keeping things simple in this Smashing Magazine article.

Color

chalk colors 730x414 The psychology of Web design: How colors, typefaces and spacing affect your mood

When designing a website, often the colors are dictated by the organization’s new or existing visual identity (or brand). But how these colors are used affects how the visitor feels when they visit your site.

Most visual identities have neutral colors (i.e the tints, shades, and hues of whites, grays, and blacks) that are used along with their main colors. In most modern designs, these neutral colors often take dominance in terms of how much real estate they take up.

For instance, if an organization’s main colors are blue and yellow, with neutrals being white and black, it is likely that they may choose a white background to display their content on, instead of a blue or yellow background.

These neutrals act much like white space does: it provides an opportunity for rest. Using the example above, if all you see on that organization’s website was blue and yellow, it would be an overwhelming site to focus your attention on (think yellow text on a blue background).

The types of colors you use also play into the psychology of your Web design. Cooler colors (blues, greens, purples) often provide an inviting, professional and relaxed feeling. In contrast, it can be used to give a very cold and unfriendly feeling as well. Warmer colors (yellows, oranges, reds) are soothing, warm, and give a sense of creativity but can also give off negative feelings such as anger and stress.

example color design 730x321 The psychology of Web design: How colors, typefaces and spacing affect your mood

In addition, neutrals such as white often give a positive feeling of openness, but could also feel bland and dull. Grays are often considered slick, modern, and clean, but can be very cold and uninviting. Blacks are often associated with being professional and clean cut, but is also very overpowering and can be rather generic.

How you use colors to help convey the positive feelings discussed above depends on the tint (lightness), hue (type) and shade (darkness) of the color as well as how much of the color you opt to use. If you want your site to be inviting, open and creative, a combination of blues and greens, with touches of yellow or orange, on a white or light gray background will help convey these positive feelings to your visitors.

For more information on how exact colors play into the psychology of web design,Vandelay Design has a great article outlining each primary and secondary color and its effects on viewers.

Typography

type we can make 730x484 The psychology of Web design: How colors, typefaces and spacing affect your mood

Finally, typography can convey tons of emotions and feelings for visitors to your website. There are thousands of typefaces out there, and thanks to advancing Web technology such as CSS3, these typefaces have found their way onto websites as well.

No more picking a typeface out of the 15 or so Web-safe fonts. This has opened the door to thousands of new typefaces that can be used. And with great choice comes great responsibility.

Typefaces are designed to be used in specific situations and for certain uses. Serif fonts (those with little serifs, or feet, on the letters like Times New Roman) are often associated with professionalism, scholarly, and seriousness, while san-serif fonts (like Helvetica) are a bit more modern feeling, clean and more informal.

nytimes font front page The psychology of Web design: How colors, typefaces and spacing affect your mood

For example, most news websites (i.e. The New York Times) use serif fonts to help convey the feeling of tradition, importance and knowledge. They want you to feel like they are an authority, that what you are reading is important and that they know what they are talking about.

Sans-serif fonts are used more and more to convey a feeling of modern, clean, sophistication and upscale. Those in the technology industry often use san-serif fonts much more than serif fonts because they want visitors to feel like they are up-to-date and futuristic.

For more on what kind of fonts to use for your website design, Super Dev Resources has two great infographics to help you navigate your typography.

The way type is presented on the page is also important. Leading (space between the lines) and kerning (space between the letters) should be evaluated as well. Large leading with lots of white space between lines makes the copy feel airier and easier to read; little leading gives a crowded feeling and is hard to read more than one paragraph at a time.

kerning The psychology of Web design: How colors, typefaces and spacing affect your moodvia Fonts.com

Space between paragraphs, margins between blocks of text and other elements on the page, and font size (and its relation to leading) are also factors to consider. Tight paragraphs are uninviting and hard to read, copy that is too close to elements such as pictures make the page feel crowded, and too large or too small font size will either make the visitor feel like you are screaming at them or whispering.

Need ideas on the types of fonts available for your Web design? Check out offerings by Abobe’s TypeKit or Google Fonts

Conclusion

It is often the designers’ job to understand the psychology of their design choices when producing a design, but understand the basics in some key areas of design will help you understand and even further help produce great content and manage your website design more effectively.

While these areas focus mainly on website design, a lot of the psychology of design can be used in other areas of design as well, such as logo and print design.

If you would like Mojoe.net to discuss developing your logo, web site, web application, need custom programming, or IT consultant, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-859-9848 or you can email us at dwerne@mojoe.net

Article Provided by The Next Web

Is LinkedIn becoming a Bazaar of Services

Wednesday, October 2nd, 2013

LinkedIn Logo

LinkedIn?  It seems like this professional network is becoming the market bazaar of services and products.  A site where people are hawking their particular merchandise or business in every post, discussion, and group that is on LinkedIn.  Every time I log in I feel like I am assaulted with ads, how-to’s , companies to follow, a list of daily achievements, and more.   I can almost hear the hustle and bustle of people talking multiple dialects with foreign music playing in the background, and can even see the opening act of the famous Walt Disney movie, Aladdin. You know the one, right–the scene with the peddler (played by Robin Williams) who greets the visitor saying, “Welcome to LinkedIn.  City of mystery, of enchantment, and the finest merchandise this side of the internet river, on sale today, come on down! Heh, heh.  Look at this! Yes!  Combination hookah and coffee maker–also makes Julienne fries.”

Now, I am the first to admit that I have posted my services and my companies achievements, however, I don’t  post daily, nor do I post in every group that I am a member of.  Usually I share useful information about articles, books and other information I have read, learned, or gathered during my last 14 years in the web development industry.  And, I try to take into account what I believe my professional network would find helpful in the technology and web industry.  In other words, it is relevant information.

I originally joined LinkedIn to connect with other professionals that I had developed a business association with and to strengthen my business relationships.  As LinkedIn grew and the ability to create a group specific to your industry was available, it was fantastic because we were afforded the opportunity to share knowledge with peers.  Groups allowed for collaboration on a global scale and social problem solving was available at the fingertips of any LinkedIn member.

LinkedIn Groups Feed

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I have often posted a development issue or problem in these groups and would get an enormous response from many different views.  I have also responded to other professionals’ queries when they had an issue to solve.  But these days, it literally appears that the groups are laden with different random sales pitches which do not even relate to the group.  I find this situation extremely frustrating, and wish that the professionals who setup the group would at least moderate to be sure that random trash did not get posted in their group.  I can’t help but wonder if some groups are so convoluted and off base at this point that the moderators have given up?

LinkedIn should take more notice of the groups that professionals have on their network;   groups that are started purely for advertising could be noted (letting you know that the group has a strong tendency to self-promote, and “junk” the site with advertisements).  If that were to occur, the professional who was considering joining any group could make an informed decision.

 

 

 

WordPress Web Site – Capstone Insurance

Friday, September 27th, 2013

Mojoe.net is proud to announce the launch of Capstone Insurance WordPress web site. Capstone Insurance Company located in Greenville, South Carolina and provides insurance services. We provided not only a custom designed WordPress web site but we also made sure that the site was fully responsive so that all devices would be able to access the site.

Capstone Insurance web site was designed in Adobe Photoshop, custom photography was provided along with photos from www.istockphoto.com. We developed the site to highlight the personal services that Capstone Insurance provides to its customers. We used large navigation buttons so a visitor would be able to access relative and useful information very quickly. We choose WordPress at the Content Management System because we wanted a system that the client could easily maintain and update without knowing complicated HTML.

Capstone Insurance Services, LLC is a full service property and casualty insurance agency located in Greenville, South Carolina. Since 1995 Capstone has helped corporate and individual customers deal with the pure risk faced in their daily operations and activities.

WordPress Web Site by Mojoe.net

You can visit www.capstoneinsurance.com

If you would like Mojoe.net to discuss developing your web site, web applicaiton or need custom programming, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-859-9848 or you can email us at dwerne@mojoe.net

WordPress Most Popular Plugins

Monday, January 21st, 2013

WordPress has a lot of great and functional plug-ins. Here is a list of the 30 most popular WordPress plug-ins. Not only do we tell you who/what the plugins are but give you links to the plug-ins, so if you have a WordPress installation you can install these plug-ins yourself. If you need help feel free to contact us at info@mojoe.net

I have used and do use the majority of every single one of these WordPress plug-ins for WordPress installation that we create for our customers. There are some very useful and helpful plug-ins that make your WordPress web site preform better and more efficiently to plug-ins that will better optimize and submit your site to search engines.

 

1.) All in One SEO Pack – WordPress SEO plug-in to automatically optimize your WordPress blog for Search Engines.

Active Versions: 25 | Downloads: 12,961,000 | Rating: 3.8 out of 5 stars | Link: All in One SEO Pack

2.) Akismet – Akismet checks your comments against the Akismet web service to see if they look like spam or not and lets you review the spam it catches under your blog’s “Comments” admin Screen.

Active Versions: 8 | Downloads: 12, 253,538 | Rating: 4 out 5 stars | Link: Akismet

3.) Google XML Sitemaps – This plugin will generate a special XML sitemap which will help search engines like Google, Bing, Yahoo and Ask.com to better index your blog or Word Press web site. With such sitemap, it’s much easier for the crawlers to see the complete structure fo your site and retrieve in more efficiently.

Active Versions: 11 | Downloads: 9,053,789 | Rating: 4.6 out of 5 stars | Link: Google XML Sitemaps

4.) Contact Form 7 – Contact Form 7 can manage multiple contact forms, plus you can customize the form and the mail contacts flexibly with simple markup. The form supports Ajax powered submitting, CAPTCHA, Akismet spam filtering and so on.

Active Versions: 24 | Downloads: 8,957,262 | Rating: 4.3 out of 5 stars | Link: Contact Form 7

5.) NextGEN Gallery – It provides a powerful engine for uploading and managing galleries of images, with the ability to batch upload, import meta data, add/delete/re-arrange/sort images, edit thumbnails, group galleries into albums, and much more.

Active Versions: 22 | Downloads: 6,258,705 | Rating: 4.2 out of 5 stars | Link: NextGEN Gallery

6.) WP Super Cache – This plug-in generates static html files from your dynamic WordPress blog or site. After a html file is generated your web server will serve that file instead of processing the comparatively heavier and more expensive WordPress PHP scripts.

Active Versions: 13 | Downloads: 3,913,716 | Rating: 4.1 out of 5 stars | Link: WP Super Cache

7.) Google Analytics for WordPress – Track your WordPress site easily and with lots of meta data: view per author & category, automatic tracking of outbound clicks and page views.

Active Versions: 13 | Downloads: 3,895,749 | Rating: 4.3 out of 5 stars | Link: Google Analytics for WordPress

8.) WPtouch – WPtouch automatically transforms your WordPress web site for mobile devices complete with ajax loading articles and smooth effects when viewed from popular mobile web browsing devices like the iPhone, iPod touch, Android mobile phones, Blackberry OS6+ mobile devices, and more!

Active Versions: 18 | Downloads: 3,805,247 | Rating: 3.8 out of 5 stars | Link: WPtouch

9.) WordPress Importer – Import posts, pages, comments, custom fields, categories, tags and more from a WordPress export file.

Active Versions: 6 | Downloads: 3,549,379 | Rating: 3.2 out of 5 stars | Link: WordPress Importer

 10.) Jetpack by WordPress – Jetpack is a WordPress plug-in that supercharges your self-hosted WordPress site or blog with awesome cloud power of WordPress.com.

Active Versions: 16 | Downloads: 3,384,705 | Rating: 3.8 out of 5 stars | Link: Jetpack by WordPress

11.) Fast Secure Contact Form – This plugin allows a webmaster to easily create and add contact forms to WordPress. The contact form will let the user send emails to a site’s admin, and also send a meeting request to talk over the phone or video. And administration panel is present, where the webmaster can create and preview unlimited forms.

Active Versions: 16 | Downloads: 3,062,540 | Rating: 4.5 out of 5 stars | Link: Fast Secure Contact Form

12.) WP-PageNavi – This plugin provides the wp_pagenav() template tag which generates fancy pagination links.

Active Versions: 10 | Downloads: 3,137,808 | Rating: 4 out of 5 stars | Link: WP-PageNavi

13.) WordPress SEO by Yoast – Improve your WordPress SEO. Write better content and have a fully optimized WordPress site using the WordPress SEO plugin by Yoast.

Active Versions: 15 | Downloads: 2,849,862 | Rating: 4.7 out of 5 stars | Link: WordPress SEO by Yoast

14.) Share Buttons by Lockerz / AddtoAny – The WordPress plugin to help share, bookmark, and email your posts and pages using any service, such as Facebook, Twitter, StumbleUpon, Google, Digg, Delicious, and well over 100 more sharing and social bookmarking sites.

Active Versions: 19 | Downloads: 2,391,274 | Rating: 4.1 out of 5 stars | Link: Share Buttons by Lockerz / AddtoAny

15.) WP e-Commerce – WP e-Commerce is a free WordPress Shopping Cart Plugin that lets customers buy your products, services and digital downloads online.

Active Versions: 24 | Downloads: 2,168,848 | Rating: 2.8 out of 5 stars | Link: WP e-Commerce

16.) Google Analyticator – Google Analyticator adds the necessary JavaScript code to enable Google Analytic’s logging on any WordPress blog. This eliminates the need to edit your template code to begin logging. Google Analyticator also includes several widgets for displaying Analytic’s data in the admin  and on your blog.

Active Versions: 9 | Downloads: 22,071,028 | Rating: 3.6 out of 5 stars | Link: Google Analyticator

17.) Yet Another Related Posts Plugin – Yet Another Related Posts Plugin (YARPP) gives you a list of posts and/or pages related to the current entry, introducing the reader to other relevant content on your site.

Active Versions: 21 | Downloads: 2,008,447| Rating: 3.7 out of 5 stars | Link: Yet Another Related Posts Plugin

18.) TinyMCE Advanced – This plugin add 16 plugins to TinyMICE: Advanced HR, Advanced Image, Advanced Link, Advanced List, Context Menu, Emotions ( Smiles), Date and Time, IESpell, Layer, Nonbreaking, Print, Search and Replace, Style, Table, Visual Characters and XHTML Extras.

Active Versions: 10 | Downloads: 1,938,183 | Rating: 3.8 out of 5 stars | Link: TinyMCF Advanced

19.) Sociable – After introducing Sociable Skyscraper, the ultimate advanced and feature-packed plugin for setting up a rating system on your WordPress blog. It is sort of banner that reminds your readers to spread the word. You can select and customize several features, such as test, color, and length in order to ensure your readers and their friends a great Sociable Experience.

Active Versions: 13 | Downloads: 1,884,805 | Rating: 4.1 out of 5 stars | Link: Sociable

20.) Really Simple CAPTCHA – Really Simple CAPTCHA does not work alone and is tended to work with other plugins. It is originally created for Contact Form 7; however, you can use it with your own plugin

Active Versions: 5 | Downloads: 1,938,183 | Rating: 4.4 out of 5 stars | Link: CAPTCHA

21.) GTrans – Make your website available to the world using Google Translate.

Active Versions: 10 | Downloads: 1,643,512 | Rating: 3.8 out of 5 stars | Link: Google Translate

22.) WP to Twitter – WP to Twitter automatically posts a Tweet from your WordPress blog to Twitter using your URL shortening service to provide a link back your post from Twitter.

Active Versions: 23 | Downloads: 1,184,228 | Rating: 3.9 out of 5 stars | Link: WP to Twitter

23.) Broken Link Checker – This plugin will monitor your blog looking for broken links and let you know if any are found.

Active Versions: 12 | Downloads: 3,384,705 | Rating: 4.1 out of 5 stars | Link: Broken Link Checker

24.) AddThis – The AddThis Social Bookmarking Widget allows any visitor to bookmark and share your site easily with over 330 popular services.

Active Versions: 20 | Downloads: 1,118,777 | Rating: 3.4 out of 5 stars | Link: AddThis

25.) W3 Total Cache – Imporve site performance and user experience via caching browser, page, object, minify and content delivery network support.

Active Versions: 4 | Downloads: 1,371,650 | Rating: 4.6 out of 5 stars | Link: W3 Total Cache

26.) BuddyPress – BuddyPress lets users sign-up and start creating profiles, posting messages, making connections, creating and interacting in groups, and much more.

Active Versions: 17 | Downloads: 1,283,508 | Rating: 3.9 out of 5 stars | Link: BuddyPress

27.) WP-DB-Backup – WP-DB-Backup allows you easily to backup your core WordPress database tables. You may also backup other tables in the same database.

Active Versions: 2 | Downloads: 1,492,535 | Rating: 3.7 out of 5 stars | Link: WP-DB-Backup

28.) Smart YouTube PRO – Smart YouTube is a professional WordPress Video plugin that allows you to easily insert videos/playlists into your post, comments and in your RSS feeds.

Active Versions: 17 | Downloads: 1,424,742 | Rating: 3.5 out of 5 stars | Link: Smart YouTube Pro

29.) Redirection – Redirection is a WordPress plugin to manage 301 re-directions  keep track of 404 errors, and generally tidy up any loose ends your site may have. This is particularly useful if you are migrating your pages from an old website, or are changing the directory of your WordPress installation.

Active Versions: 11 | Downloads: 1,157,384 | Rating: 3.8 out of 5 stars | Link: Redirection

30.) WP-Polls – WP-Polls is extremely customizable via templates and css styles and there are tons of options for you to choose to ensure that WP-Polls runs they way you wanted.

Active Versions: 7 | Downloads: 1,173,730 | Rating: 3.7 out of 5 stars | Link: WP-Polls

 

Responsive Images and Web Standards at the Turning Point

Tuesday, May 15th, 2012

Responsive Images and Web Standards at the Turning Point

by MAT MARQUIS

The goal of a “responsive images” solution is to deliver images optimized for the end user’s context, rather than serving the largest potentially necessary image to everyone. Unfortunately, this hasn’t been quite so simple in practice as it is in theory.

Recently, all of the ongoing discussion around responsive images just got real: a solution is currently being discussed with the WHATWG. And we’re in the thick of it now: we’re throwing around references to picture and img set; making vague references to polyfills and hinting at “use cases” as though developers everywhere are following every missive on the topic. That’s a lot to parse through, especially if you’re only tuning in now—during the final seconds of the game.

The markup pattern that gets selected stands to have a tremendous influence on how developers build websites in the future. Not just responsive or adaptive websites, either. All websites.

What a long, strange, etc.

Let’s go over the path that led us here one more time, with feeling:

The earliest discussion of responsive images came about—predictably enough—framed in the context of responsive web design. A full-bleed image in a flexible container requires an image large enough to cover the widest possible display size. An image designed to span a container two thousand pixels wide at its largest means serving an image at least two thousand pixels wide. Scaling that image down to suit a smaller display is a trivial matter in CSS, but the requested image size remains the same—and the smaller the screen, the better the chance that bandwidth is at a premium.

It’s clear that developers’ best efforts to mitigate these wasteful requests were all doomed to fall short—and not for lack of talent or effort. Some of the greatest minds in the mobile web—and web development in general, really—had come together in an effort to solve this problem. I was also there, for some reason.

I covered early efforts in my previous ALA article, so I’ll spare everyone the gruesome details here. The bottom line is that we can’t hack our way out of this one. The problem remains clear, however, and it needs to be solved—but we can’t do it with the technologies at our disposal now. We need something new.

Those of us working on the issue formed the Responsive Images Community Group (RICG) to facilitate conversations with standards bodies and browser representatives.

“W3C has created Community Groups and Business Groups so that developers, designers, and anyone passionate about the Web has a place to have discussions and publish documents.”
http://www.w3.org/community/

Unfortunately, we were laboring under the impression that Community Groups shared a deeper inherent connection with the standards bodies than it actually does. When the WHATWG proposed a solution last week, many of the people involved in that discussion hadn’t participated in the RICG. In fact, some key decision makers hadn’t so much as heard of it.

Proposed markup patterns

The pattern currently proposed by the WHATWG is a new set attribute on the img element. As best I can tell from the description, this markup is intended to solve two very specific issues: an equivalent to ‘min-width’ media queries in the ‘600w 200h’ parts of the string, and pixel density in the ‘1x’/’2x’ parts of the string.

The proposed syntax is:

 

<img src="face-600-200@1.jpg" alt="" set="face-600-200@1.jpg 600w 200h 1x, 
face-600-200@2.jpg 600w 200h 2x, face-icon.png 200w 200h"> 

 

I have some concerns around this new syntax, but I’ll get to that in a bit.

The markup pattern proposed earlier by the RICG (the community group I’m part of) aims to use the inherent flexibility of media queries to determine the most appropriate asset for a user’s browsing context. It also uses behavior already specced for use on the video element—in the way of mediaattributes—so that conditional loading of media sources follows a predictable and consistent pattern.

That markup is as follows:

 

<picture alt=""> <source src="mobile.jpg" /> <source src="large.jpg" media="min-width: 600px" /> 
<source src="large_1.5x-res.jpg" media="min-width: 600px, » min-device-pixel-ratio: 1.5" /> 
<img src="mobile.jpg" /> </picture> 

 

Via Github, this pattern has been codified in something as close to a specas I could manage, for the sake of having all the key implementation details in one place.

Polyfills

So far, two polyfills exist to bring the RICG’s proposed picture functionality to older browsers: Scott Jehl’s Picturefill and Abban Dunne’s jQuery Picture.

To my knowledge, there are currently no polyfills for the WHATWG’s newly proposed img set pattern. It’s worth noting that a polyfill for any solution relying on the img tag will likely suffer from the same issues we encountered when we tried to implement a custom ”responsive images” solution in the past.

Fortunately, both patterns provide a reliable fallback if the new functionality isn’t natively supported and no polyfill has been applied: img set using the image’s original src, and picture using the same fallback pattern proven by the video tag. When the new element is recognized, the fallback content provided within the element is ignored—for example, a Flash-based video in the case of the video tag, and an img tag in the above picture example.

Differing proposals

Participants in the WHATWG have stated on the public mailing list and via the #WHATWG IRC channel that browser representatives prefer the img set pattern, which is an important consideration during these conversations. Most members of the WHATWG are representatives of major browsers, so they understand the browser side better than anyone.

On the other hand, the web developer community has strongly advocatedfor the picture markup pattern. Many developers familiar with this subject have stated—in no uncertain terms that the img set syntax is at best unfamiliar—and at worst completely indecipherable. I can’t recall seeing this kind of unity among the community around any web standards discussion in the past—and in a conversation about markup semantics, no less!

We’re on the same team

While the WHATWG’s preferences, and the web developer community’s differing preferences, certainly should be considered as we finalize a standard solution to the problem of responsive images, our highest priority must remain providing a clear benefit to our users: the needs of the user trump convenience for web developers and browser developers alike.

For that reason (for the sake of those who use the web), it’s critical not to cast these discussions as “us vs. them.” Standards representatives, browser representatives, and developers are all partners in this endeavor. We all serve a higher goal: to make the web accessible, usable, and delightful for all. Whatever their stance on img set or picture, I’m certain everyone involved is working toward a common goal, and we all agree that a ”highest common denominator” approach is indefensible. We simply cannot serve massive, high-resolution images indiscriminately. Their potential cost to our users is too great—especially considering the tens of thousands of users in developing countries who pay for every additional kilobyte they consume, but will see no benefit to the huge file they’ve downloaded.

That said, I have some major issues with the img set syntax, at least in its present incarnation:

1. USE CASES

Use cases are a list of potential applications for the markup patterns, the problems that they stand to solve, and the benefits.

I’ve published a list of use cases for the picture element on the WHATWG wiki. It is by no means exhaustive, as picture can deliver an image source based on any combination of media queries. The most common use cases are screen size and resolution, for certain, but it could extend as far as serving a layout-appropriate image source for display on screen, but a high-resolution version for printing—all on the same page, without any additional scripting.

At present, no list of use cases has been published for img set. We’ve been working under the assumption, based on conversations on the WHATWG list and in the WHATWG IRC channel, that img set covers two uses specifically: serving high-resolution images to high-resolution screens, and functionality similar to min-width media queries in the way of the 600wstrings.

It’s vital that we have a way to take advantage of new techniques for detecting client-side capabilities as they become available to us, and thepicture element gives us a solid foundation to build upon—as media queries evolve over time, we could find ourselves with countless ways to tailor asset delivery.

We may have that same foundation in the img tag as well, but in a inevitably fragmented way.

2. MARGIN FOR ERROR

I don’t mind saying that the img set markup is inscrutable. It’s a markup pattern unlike anything seen before in either HTML or CSS. This goes well beyond author preference. An unfamiliar syntax will inevitably lead to authorship errors, in which our end users will be the losers.

As I said on the WHATWG mailing list, however, given a completely foreign and somewhat puzzling new syntax, I think it’s far more likely we’ll see the following:

 

 <img src="face-600-200@1.jpeg" alt="" set="face-600-200@1.jpeg 600w 1x, 
face-600-200@2.jpeg 600w 2x, face-icon.png 200w"> 

 

Become:

 <img src="face-600-200@1.jpeg" alt="" set="face-600-200@1.jpeg 600 1x, 
face-600-200@2.jpeg 600 2x, face-icon.png 200"> 

Or:

 <img src="face-600-200@1.jpeg" alt="" set="face-600-200@1.jpeg, 
600w 1x face-600-200@2.jpeg 600w 2x, face-icon.png 200w"> 

 

Regardless of how gracefully these errors should fail, I’m confident this is a “spot the differences” game very few developers will be excited to play.

I don’t claim to be any smarter than the average developer, but I am speaking as a core contributor to jQuery Mobile and from my experiences working on the responsive BostonGlobe.com site: tailoring assets for client capabilities is kind of my thing. To be perfectly honest, I still don’t understand the proposed behavior fully.

I would hate to think that we could be paving the way for countless errors just because img set is easier to implement in browsers. Implementation on the browser side takes place once; authoring will take place thousands of times. And according to the design principles of HTML5 itself, author needs must take precedence over browser maker needs. Not to mention those other HTML5 design principles: solve real problems, pave the cowpaths, support existing content, and avoid needless complexity.

Avoid needless complexity

Authors should not be burdened with additional complexity. If implemented,img set stands to introduce countless points of failure—and, at worst, something so indecipherable that authors will simply avoid it.

I’m sure no one is going to defend to the death the idea that the video andaudio tags are paragons of efficient markup, but they work. For better or worse: the precedents they’ve set are here to stay. Pave the cowpaths.This is how HTML5 handles rich media with conditional sources, and authors are already familiar with these markup patterns. The potential costs of deviation far outweigh the immediate benefit to implementors.

Any improvements to client-side asset delivery should apply universally. By introducing a completely disparate system to determine which assets should be delivered to the client, improvements may well have to be made twice to suit two systems: once to suit the familiar media attribute used by videotags, and once to suit the img tag alone. This could leave implementors maintaining two codebases that effectively serve the same purpose, while authors learn two different methods for every advancement made. That sounds like the world before web standards, not the new, rational world standards are supposed to support.

The rationale that dare not speak its name

It’s hard to imagine why there’s been such a vehement defense of the img set markup. The picture element provides a wider number of potential use cases, has two functional polyfills today (while an efficient polyfill may not even be possible with the ‘img set’ pattern), and has seen an unprecedented level of support from the developer community.

img set is the pattern preferred by implementors on the browser side, and while that is certainly a key factor, it doesn’t justify a deficient solution. My concern is that the unspoken argument against picture on the WHATWG mailing list has been that it wasn’t invented there. My fear is that the consequences of that entrenched philosophy may fall to our users. It is they who will suffer when our sites fail (or when developers, unable to understand the WHATWG’s challenging syntax, simply force all users to download huge image files).

WE THE PEOPLE WHO MAKE WEBSITES

I’ll be honest: for me, no small part of this is about ensuring that we designers and developers have a voice in the standards process. The work that the developer community has put into the picture element solution is unprecedented, and I can only hope that it marks the start of a long and mutually beneficial relationship between we authors and the standards bodies—tumultuous though that start may be.

If you feel strongly about this topic, I encourage all designers and developers to join the WHATWG mailing list and IRC channel to participate in the ongoing conversation.

We developers should—and can—be partners in the creation of new standards. Lend your voices to this discussion, and to others like it in the future. The web will be better for it.

Pedal Chic of Greenville Web Design choose Mojoe.net

Wednesday, March 21st, 2012

Greenville Web Design Company Mojoe.net , meets with Robin Belyina of Pedal Chic

Meeting with Wendy Lynam of Greenville Marketing Lab and Robin Bylenga at Pedal Chic in Greenville, South Carolina. Pedal Chic is a women’s specific bike shop and active wear boutique; Mojoe.net  has been chosen as the web design company for Pedal Chic. We are very excited about this project and are looking forward to developing a site that is not only unique and chic, but having a site that is focused on showcasing all of the activewear for women and their bicycles. We will be posting their new design soon. So be sure to check back often.

Update:
We have just completed the wireframe and site architecture for Pedal Chic. We are currently working on the mood board.

You can check out the wireframe below for Pedal Chic of Greenville, South Carolina

Pedal Chic Wireframe and Architecture by Mojoe.net

 

Update:
Here is the Mood Board that we completed for Pedal Chic of Greenville, South Carolina

 

Update:
Check out the home page web design for Pedal Chic Greenville SC

Web Design Concept by Mojoe.net

You can check the site out at www.pedalchic.com. We not only designed the wireframe, site architecture, mood board and concept; we developed the entire site into a custom wordpress theme.

We did this because the customer has a strong familiarity with WordPress and the SEO tools and optimization that can be employed make it extremely easy to integrate the necessary tools for getting your site listed in the search engines.

 

Check out Referral Key | Web Design Greenville SC

Monday, June 20th, 2011

What is Referral Key?

When your colleague finds someone who can use your service, they simply click “Send Referral”, and provide the contact information of the person they’re referring. You’re immediately notified of the new lead waiting for you on Referral Key. It’s now up to you to contact the client, and close the sale!

Give rewards, get referrals. Give referrals, get rewards
You can grow your business by offering rewards to other people who send you successful referrals. You can also receive rewards for sending referrals to other members. Choose from Cash, Omaha Steaks, L.L.Bean or Callaway Golf gift cards.

Get free leads from consumers in your area
Thousands of consumers use our Pro Portal everyday, looking for quality service professionals like you! Consumers simply enter their contact information and the type of service they’re looking for and we pass the leads on to matching members.

Check it out at: https://www.referralkey.com/mojoe

Web Design Greenville SC | Mojoe Blog is proudly powered by WordPress | Entries (RSS) and Comments (RSS).

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox

Join other followers:

Toms Sko
toms sko nettbutikk
toms sko norge
toms sko salg
Toms
Billige Toms Sko Dame
Billige Toms Sko
colorful toms
toms shoes classics
toms shoes for men
toms shoes men
tom sko
toms mens shoes
canvas toms
toms stripes
tom's shoes men
toms pics
jordans for sale
Toms Sko
toms sko nettbutikk
toms sko norge
toms sko salg
Toms Sko
toms sko nettbutikk
toms sko norge
toms sko salg
Toms Sko
toms sko nettbutikk
toms sko norge
toms sko salg
Toms Sko
toms sko nettbutikk
toms sko norge
toms sko salg
Toms Sko
toms sko nettbutikk
toms sko norge
toms sko salg
Toms Sko
toms sko nettbutikk
toms sko norge
toms sko salg
jordans for sale
cheap jordans
buy authentic cheap
jordans for sale
Jordan 7 Bordeaux
Jordan 6 Low Infrared 23
Jordan 13 Low Bred
Jordan 11 Low Bred
Jordan retro shoes store
buy jordans shoes
jordan shoes for sale
jordan store
authentic jordans
Air Jordan retro shoes
Toms Sko
Toms Sko
colorful toms
colorful toms shoes
Toms Sko
toms shoes classics
toms shoes classics
toms classics
toms classics
Toms Sko
Toms Sko
Toms Sko
toms Sko for salg
toms Sko billig
toms Sko for salg
Toms Sko
Buy TOMS Shoes Online
Buy TOMS Shoes
Buy TOMS
Classics TOMS
toms shoes
toms sale
toms outlet
cheap toms shoes
toms children
women toms
toms men
toms shoes 2015
toms sale stores
toms shoes
toms one shoes
Toms Sale
Buy TOMS Shoes Online
Buy TOMS Shoes
Buy TOMS
TOMS
Classics TOMS
toms shoe
toms sale
toms outlet
cheap toms shoes
toms children
women toms
toms men
toms shoes 2015
toms shoes sale
toms shoes shop
toms sko
toms sko uttak
toms sko
toms sko billig